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Dedad

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The subjects or followers of Cú Roí mac Dáiri. Much evidence suggests that Clann Dedad is another name for the Érainn, an important early non-Goidelic people of Ireland. In the Táin Bó...

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Dedad

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 133 words.

The subjects or followers of Cú Roí mac Dáiri. Much evidence suggests that Clann Dedad is another name for the

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Dedad

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The subjects or followers of Cú Roí mac Dáiri. Much evidence suggests that Clann Dedad is another name for the Érainn, an important early non-Goidelic people of Ireland. In the Táin Bó...

See overview in Oxford Index

Daui Dalta Dedad

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 71 words.

[Ir., Blinder of Dedad].

King of Tara, son of Cairbre Losc, who, according to the usual story, blinded his

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Daui Dalta Dedad

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Ir., Blinder of Dedad].

King of Tara, son of Cairbre Losc, who, according to the usual story, blinded his brother Dedad lest he aspire to the throne himself. In a variant he is...

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Conganchnes mac Dedad

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Ir., horn-skinned].

Described as the brother or uncle of Cú Roí. He avenges that hero's ‘death’, but he is really Cú Roí revivus. Later the figure known as Conganchnes is slain by...

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Dáire mac Dedad

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Ancestor-deity of the Érainn and the Corcu Loígde of early Ireland. T. F. O'Rahilly asserted that the god Bolg was really Dáire under another aspect: Early Irish History and Mythology...

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Conganchnes mac Dedad

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 86 words.

[Ir., horn-skinned].

Described as the brother or uncle of Cú Roí. He avenges that hero's ‘death’, but he is

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Dáire mac Dedad

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 35 words.

Ancestor-deity of the Érainn and the Corcu Loígde of early Ireland. T. F. O'Rahilly asserted that the god Bolg was

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Duach Dallta Deadad

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 9 words.

Variant spelling of Daui Dalta Dedad.

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Cairbre Losc

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 11 words.

[Ir., lame].

Father of Daui Dalta Dedad.

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Dóelchu

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The dog of Conganchnes mac Dedad whose dripping blood kills Celtchair mac Uthechair.

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Dóelchu

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 14 words.

The dog of Conganchnes mac Dedad whose dripping blood kills Celtchair mac Uthechair.

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Fir Morca

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 48 words.

Legendary people of early Ireland, whose king was Scoriath, conventionally described as big men who lived near Luachair Dedad

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Ard Caille

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Ir., high division of land].

Site in north Co. Cork named in early poems as the burial-place of Fionn mac Cumhaill; a more usual site is Luachair Dedad in western Munster.

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Fir Morca

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Legendary people of early Ireland, whose king was Scoriath, conventionally described as big men who lived near Luachair Dedad in west Munster. O'Rahilly (1946) argues that the name ‘Fir...

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Bolg

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

1 Bolga, Bulga [Ir., lightning (?)]. Name borne by several shadowy figures in early Irish mythology and history of whom the most important appears to be the ancestor deity of...

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Celtchair

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Often with the patronymic mac Uithechair, mac Uthechar, mac Cuthechair, mac Uthidir, etc.; sometimes Celtchair Mór [the Great]. A leading figure in the Ulster Cycle, often included in...

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Niam

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

1 Sometime wife of Conall Cernach, his other consort being Lendabair. She is better remembered, however, for nursing Cúchulainn, during which time she becomes his mistress. She...

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Cú Roí

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Ir., hound of the plain (?); hound of god (?)].

Usually seen as a hero of Munster, Cú Roí is one of the most enigmatic figures in early Irish narrative; he may also be a divinity,...

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