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Denham Tracts

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Michael Aislabie Denham (died 1859) a general merchant of Piercebridge, Durham, was early in the field of folklore collecting, and he died before the new movement had become fashionable. As...

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Denham Tracts

Overview page.

Michael Aislabie Denham (died 1859) a general merchant of Piercebridge, Durham, was early in the field of folklore collecting, and he died before the new movement had become fashionable. As...

See overview in Oxford Index

Denham Tracts

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 164 words.

Michael Aislabie Denham (died 1859) a general merchant of Piercebridge, Durham, was early in the field of folklore collecting,

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PUDDING, naming: prevents bursting

Iona Opie and Moira Tatem.

in A Dictionary of Superstitions

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Popular Beliefs and Controversial Knowledge. 66 words.

1895 J. HARDY Denham Tracts 365 [Northumb.] The peasant women believe that the ‘black and white puddings’ made at a

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LAST FOOD/DRINK: ‘Carling’ peas divination

Iona Opie and Moira Tatem.

in A Dictionary of Superstitions

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Popular Beliefs and Controversial Knowledge. 77 words.

1895 J. HARDY Denham Tracts II 282. On Carling Sunday … fried pease are served up on a dish. Every

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St Thomas's Day

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(21 December).

In many areas this was the date for thomasing (or gooding), a ritualized begging for food in readiness for Christmas, and Wright and Lones list a number of doles...

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seventh son, daughter

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From the 16th century onwards, a seventh son (or, more rarely, seventh daughter) was widely thought to have psychic powers, usually as a healer, but sometimes as a dowser or fortune-teller;...

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deafness, earache

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A regular cure for deafness or earache in English folklore is to apply a hot onion to the ear, or to drip its juice into the ear, although some sources claim that garlic, figs, or even...

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hemp seed divination

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One of the most-often quoted love-divination procedures, first described in Mother Bunch's Closet (1685):Carry the seed in your apron, and with your right hand throw it over your left...

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souling

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A visiting custom carried out in the 19th and 20th centuries mainly by children, but previously by adults, in the Shropshire, north Staffordshire, Cheshire, and Lancashire area, on All...

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eels

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A common belief was that a long black horsehair thrown into a running stream instantly becomes a live eel or water snake. William Harrison, The Description of England (1587: 321) provides...

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fingernails

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The little white specks, sometimes seen on the nails of the left hand, signify gifts on the thumb; friends on the first finger; foes on the second; lovers on the third; a journey to be...

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