Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-20 of 1,692 items for:

Detective x clear all

Refine by subject

 

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

Detective

Overview page. Subjects: Law.

Detective profession has two branches in the United States. One branch consists of special plainclothes officers in federal, state, and especially local law enforcement agencies. These...

See overview in Oxford Index

Detective

David Ray Papke.

in The Oxford Companion to American Law

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 872 words.

Detective profession has two branches in the United States. One branch consists of special plainclothes officers in federal, state, and

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

detective

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 85 words.

[M19th]

The development of an organized police force demanded a word such as detective, and it was duly formed in

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective

Overview page. Subjects: Law.

Detective profession has two branches in the United States. One branch consists of special plainclothes officers in federal, state, and especially local law enforcement agencies. These...

See overview in Oxford Index

Police Detective

Marcia J. Songer.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1508 words.

A private detective may reject cases. An amateur detective might also, but the police detective must take every case presented.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Private Detective

T. J. Binyon.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1046 words.

The private detective is one of the three main types of fictional detective, the others being the amateur detective and

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Private Detective

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

The private detective is one of the three main types of fictional detective, the others being the amateur detective and the police detective. Although characters who may be described as ...

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

Surrogate Detective

Rosemary Herbert.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 196 words.

The term “surrogate detective” is applied to characters who solve crimes yet who are neither amateur nor professional detectives. Like

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

detective stories

Lars Erik Böttiger.

in The Oxford Companion to Medicine

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 2004 words.

There are several reasons for considering the detective story in a serious medical work.

Some doctors have written excellent detective

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Police Detective

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

A private detective may reject cases. An amateur detective might also, but the police detective must take every case presented. That fact underlies the police procedural in its attempt to...

See overview in Oxford Index

Surrogate Detective

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

The term “surrogate detective” is applied to characters who solve crimes yet who are neither amateur nor professional detectives. Like the accidental sleuth, the surrogate sleuth may simply...

See overview in Oxford Index

Lost Detectives

Pablo Piccato.

in History of Infamy

April 2017; p ublished online January 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of the Americas. 7677 words.

This chapter looks at policemen and detectives in postrevolutionary Mexico. It discusses the weakness of forensic methods and the lack of prestige of police and private detectives. It...

Go to University of California Press »  abstract

detective fiction

in Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

January 2000; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century). 1200 words.

Shadowy pursuers, teasing suspense, ingenious plotting, and exposure of past injustices by amateur sleuths playing detective characterize several of the

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective Fiction

Stephen Noreiko.

in The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

January 1995; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (European). 425 words.

Although Sue, Ponson du Terrail, or Vidocq can be cited as precursors, with Poe an obvious influence, detective

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective Novel

John M. Reilly.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1290 words.

The detective novel is that form of long fiction centered upon investigation of a criminal problem. Typically the narrative presents

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Amateur Detective

Susan Oleksiw.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1114 words.

The first detective of the mystery genre was an amateur. In Edgar Allan Poe's story “The Murders in the

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Armchair Detective

Mary Rose Sullivan.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 967 words.

is a phrase that describes a type of fictional detective who solves crimes solely on the basis of secondhand information,

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

detective fiction

Jenny Stringer.

in The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

January 1996; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards). 956 words.

Among the most enduring and widely read styles of popular writing in the twentieth century, the detective novel is a

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective Fiction

Mary Hadley.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (American). 5409 words.

It is hard to imagine a time when Britain and France did not have a police force and detectives whose

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective Fiction

Caroline Reitz.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 2997 words.

It seems simple enough to define detective fiction as a category of fiction, established in the Victorian era, in which

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Detective Work

Martin Innes.

in Investigating Murder

February 2003; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Law. 8994 words.

This chapter examines the logics, processes, and techniques that detectives employ in murder investigations. It is particularly concerned with how investigative actions are ordered and...

Go to Oxford Scholarship Online »  abstract