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Diadochos

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

(Διάδοχος), bishop of Photike in Epiros, prominent opponent of Monophysitism in the 450s; born ca.400, died before 486.

Little else is known, though a possible connection with...

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Diadochos

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

(Διάδοχος), bishop of Photike in Epiros, prominent opponent of Monophysitism in the 450s; born ca.400, died before 486.

Little else is known, though a possible connection with...

See overview in Oxford Index

Diadochos (400)

Barry Baldwin.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 198 words.

(Διάδοχος), bishop of Photike in Epiros, prominent opponent of Monophysitism in the 450s; born ca.400, died before 486

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Damaskios

Barry Baldwin.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 288 words.

(Δαμάσκιος), or Damaskios Diadochos, last scholarch of the Academy of Athens; born Damascus ca.460?, died after 538

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Damaskios

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

(Δαμάσκιος), or Damaskios Diadochos, last scholarch of the Academy of Athens; born Damascus ca.460?, died after 538. Damaskios both studied and taught rhetoric at Alexandria, also studying...

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dysdiadochokinesia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Impaired ability to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapid rhythmic tapping of the fingers. Also called dysdiadochokinesis. Compare adiadochokinesia. [From Greek dys- bad or...

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adiadochokinesia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

An inability, sometimes classified as a form of apraxia, to perform rapid rhythmic movements such as finger tapping, often indicative of damage to the cerebellum. Compare...

See overview in Oxford Index