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Eustache Deschamps

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval).

(c. 1346–c. 1406),

French poet, a disciple of Guillaume de Machaut, influential in the development of the ballade, and the writer of the first treatise on poetry in French. He...

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Eustache Deschamps

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval).

(c. 1346–c. 1406),

French poet, a disciple of Guillaume de Machaut, influential in the development of the ballade, and the writer of the first treatise on poetry in French. He...

See overview in Oxford Index

Deschamps, Eustache (<i>c.</i> 1346–<i>c.</i> 1406)

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 47 words.

(c. 1346–c. 1406),

French poet, a disciple of Guillaume de Machaut, influential in the development

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Deschamps, Eustache (<i>c.</i>1340–1404)

Christine Scollen‐Jimack.

in The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

January 1995; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (European). 669 words.

(c.1340–1404).

French poet. Also known as Eustache Morel, he was born in Vertus, near Épernay. His

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Deschamps, Eustache (<i>c.</i>1344–1404)

Edited by Douglas Gray.

in The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval). 568 words.

(c.1344–1404 or 1405)

a French poet, and contemporary of Chaucer. A native of Champagne, he

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Deschamps, Eustache (1340–c.1404)

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 68 words.

A disciple of Guillaume de *Machaut, he wrote a vast number of ballades and the first treatise on poetry in French (...

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Deschamps, Eustache (<i>c.</i>1346–<i>c.</i>1406)

Edited by GORDON CAMPBELL.

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700). 162 words.

(c.1346–c.1406),

French poet, born in Vertus (near Éparnay) and privately educated by Guillaume de Machaut

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Deschamps, Eustache (<i>c</i>.1346–1406×7)

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 96 words.

Deschamps spent most of his career in governmental circles, serving Louis, duke of *Orléans. Heavily influenced by Guillaume

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Andrieu, F. - composer

Gilbert Reaney.

in Grove Music Online

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 184 words.

(fl late 14th century). French composer. The only composition attributable to him with certainty is the four-part bitextual ballade Armes, amours/O flour des flours set to the text by...

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Franciscus, Magister - composer

Ursula Günther.

in Grove Music Online

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 456 words.

(fl 1370–80). French composer. He may be the F. Andrieu who, according to two texts by Eustache Deschamps, composed the four-part ballade Armes, amours/O flour des flours mourning the death...

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Lyrical Humor(s) in the “Fumeur” Songs

Julie Singer.

in The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies

December 2015; p ublished online June 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Music; Musicology and Music History. 9568 words.

A small corpus of late fourteenth-century comical lyrics, most composed by the poet Eustache Deschamps, presents the lyricist or performer as a fumeur (literally, “smoker”): a creative but...

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chant royal

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

[shahn rwa-yal]

A French verse form normally consisting of five stanzas of eleven 10-syllable lines rhyming ababccddede, followed by an envoi (or half-stanza) rhyming ddede. The...

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Déploration

Davitt Moroney.

in Grove Music Online

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 479 words.

A poem lamenting someone’s death, and by extension, any musical setting of it. However, the term is now normally confined to late medieval and early Renaissance compositions inspired by a...

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Sir Lewis Clifford

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval).

(c.1330–1404). Clifford's family came from Devon. By 1360 he was in the service of the Black Prince, and after his death served his widow Joan and his son Richard II; he increased his...

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Death

Elizabeth Eva Leach.

in Guillaume de Machaut

March 2011; p ublished online August 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Musicology and Music History. 27289 words.

This chapter looks at the ultimate fortune of all humanity—death. Machaut's works do not just enact the symbolic lyrical deaths of male courtly lovers whose personae are clearly distinct...

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Guillaume de Machaut

Alice V. Clark.

in Medieval Studies

P ublished online March 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500); Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400); Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology. 18380 words.

Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300–1377) is recognized by most scholars as the most important French poet and composer of the 14th century. Born in Champagne and probably trained in Reims and...

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Geoffrey Chaucer

Andrew Galloway.

in Medieval Studies

P ublished online December 2010 .

Article. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500); Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy; Byzantine and Medieval Art (500 CE to 1400); Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology. 45045 words.

Since shortly after his death, Geoffrey Chaucer (b. c. 1340–d. 1400) has often been praised as the writer who most widely and momentously expanded both the range and the literary authority...

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