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Fly

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 268 words.

(1, plural ‘flys’). A one-horse hackney carriage. A contraction of fly-by-night, as sedan chairs on wheels used to be called

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fly

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 12 words.

(sl.) sharp, wide-awake. XIX. Has been doubtfully referred to FLY.

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fly

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 16 words.

flight XV; speed-regulating device, compasscard, etc. XVI; †stage-coach XVIII; light carriage XIX. f. FLY.

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fly

Overview page.

Fly a kite in figurative usage, try something out to test opinion. This meaning derives ultimately from the historical sense ‘raise money by an accommodation bill’, i.e., raise money on...

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fly

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 123 words.

fly a kite in figurative usage, try something out to test opinion. This meaning derives ultimately from the historical sense

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fly

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 198 words.

often taken as the type of something unimportant and trivial.

fly in amber a curious relic of the past, preserved

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fly

Bryan A. Garner.

in The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 66 words.

Despite those inflections, in baseball it is standard to say that a player who has hit a fly ball (i.e.,

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fly

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 147 words.

[OE]

In Old English a fly was any winged insect. In the 17th century the clergyman Edward Topsell wrote of

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fly

Overview page. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences — Medicine and Health.

n. a two-winged insect belonging to a large group called the Diptera. The mouthparts of flies are adapted for sucking and sometimes also for piercing and biting. Fly larvae...

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The Fly

William Blake.

Edited by G. E. Bentley.

in William Blake's Writings, Vol. 1: Engraved and Etched Writings

Primary Text. Subjects: Literature.

Little Fly

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