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Inanna

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Di]

Sumerian deity, the queen of heaven, who was the daughter of Nanna and the goddess of love and war, and also of storehouses and rain. Closely associated with Warka and roughly...

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Inanna

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[Di]

Sumerian deity, the queen of heaven, who was the daughter of Nanna and the goddess of love and war, and also of storehouses and rain. Closely associated with Warka and roughly...

See overview in Oxford Index

Inanna

Overview page. Subjects: Opera.

(Birtwistle: The Second Mrs Kong). Cont. Mrs Dollarama. Dead former beauty queen. Tries, but fails, to seduce Kong. Created (1994) by Phyllis Cannan.

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Inanna

Patrick Hanks, Kate Hardcastle and Flavia Hodges.

in A Dictionary of First Names

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 62 words.

From the name of a Sumerian goddess, queen of heaven and earth. Her name is of uncertain derivation, but it

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Inanna

Joyce Bourne.

in A Dictionary of Opera Characters

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Opera. 24 words.

(Birtwistle: The Second Mrs Kong). Cont. Mrs Dollarama. Dead former beauty queen. Tries, but fails, to seduce

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Inanna

Timothy Darvill.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Archaeology. 38 words.

[Di]

Sumerian deity, the queen of heaven, who was the daughter of Nanna and the goddess of love and war,

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Inanna

in The Oxford Companion to Cheese

December 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 263 words.

was the Sumerian goddess of love and war. She is identified with the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess Ishtar and the

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Inanna

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 1843 words.

The most important of the Mesopotamian Goddesses was Inanna (Ishtar), also known as Innin or Ninnin. Depending on the tradition,

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Inanna (West Asia)

Arthur Cotterell.

in A Dictionary of World Mythology

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 507 words.

Early sites excavated in Sumer indicate that temples were located in groups of two. The pair of deities worshipped were

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P<span class="smallCaps">ietro</span> M<span class="smallCaps">ander</span>, <i>Canti sumerici d'amore e morte. La vicenda della dea Inanna/Ishtar e del dio Dumuzi/Tammuz</i>

W.G.E. Watson.

in Journal of Semitic Studies

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Middle Eastern History; Middle Eastern Languages; Literary Studies - World; Biblical Studies. 0 words.

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Behavioralism

in The International Studies Encyclopedia

P ublished online January 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: International Relations. 11011 words.

Behavioralism is a paradigm that became predominant in American social sciences from the 1950s until well into the 1970s. Grounded

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