Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-10 of 12 items for:

Mourides x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

Mourides

Overview page. Subjects: Religion — African Studies.

(Arab., murīd, ‘aspirant’ or ‘disciple’).

An innovative Muslim brotherhood in Senegal. It derives from Amadu Bamba (c.1850–1927), a saintly, scholarly marabout within the Sūfī and...

See overview in Oxford Index

Mourides

Overview page. Subjects: Religion — African Studies.

(Arab., murīd, ‘aspirant’ or ‘disciple’).

An innovative Muslim brotherhood in Senegal. It derives from Amadu Bamba (c.1850–1927), a saintly, scholarly marabout within the Sūfī and...

See overview in Oxford Index

Mourides

Kelly M. Duke Bryant.

in Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Contemporary History (Post 1945). 627 words.

“Mourides” (alternatively, “Murids”) are members of Muridiyya, an Islamic Sufi order or brotherhood that originated in Senegal in the late

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Mourides

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 115 words.

(Arab., murīd, ‘aspirant’ or ‘disciple’).

An innovative Muslim brotherhood in Senegal. It derives from Amadu Bamba (c.1850–1927

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Mourides

Jeffrey Haynes.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: African History. 1092 words.

The Mouride brotherhood (Muridiyya, in Arabic; known by affiliates as “The Way of Imitation of the Prophet”) is an Islamic

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Diaspora, faith, and science: Building a Mouride hospital in Senegal

Ellen E. Foley and Cheikh Anta Babou.

in African Affairs

January 2011; p ublished online November 2010 .

Journal Article. Subjects: African Studies; International Relations; African History; Regional Political Studies. 8981 words.

This article examines a development initiative spearheaded by the members of a transnational diaspora – the creation of a medical hospital in the holy city of Touba in central Senegal....

Go to Oxford Journals »  abstract

THE <i>GRAND MAGAL</i> IN TOUBA: A RELIGIOUS FESTIVAL OF THE MOURIDE BROTHERHOOD OF SENEGAL

CHRISTIAN COULON.

in African Affairs

April 1999; p ublished online April 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: African Studies; International Relations; African History; Regional Political Studies. 0 words.

The grand magal is the annual festival of an indigenous Senegalese Muslim brotherhood, the Mourides. It takes place in Touba, the holy city of this religious order. The paper examines the g...

Go to Oxford Journals »  abstract

Religion and politics in contemporary Senegal

Paul Gifford.

in African Affairs

October 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Journal Article. Subjects: African History; International Relations; Regional Political Studies; African Studies. 9563 words.

Senegal has a clientelist political system, which is personalized, opaque, and characterized by wide impunity for the political elite. The most salient social force in the country is the...

Go to Oxford Journals »  home page

REINING IN THE MARABOUTS? DEMOCRATIZATION AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE IN SENEGAL

Linda J Beck.

in African Affairs

October 2001; p ublished online October 2001 .

Journal Article. Subjects: African Studies; International Relations; African History; Regional Political Studies. 0 words.

In 1997, the merchants of Touba Mosquée, Senegal, revolted against new taxes introduced by the rural council to fund its development plan for the holy city of the Mouride brotherhood....

Go to Oxford Journals »  abstract

Wolof Ethnic group of Senegal, Gambia, and Mauritania.

Robert Baum.

in Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, Second Edition

January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 962 words.

The Wolof, numbering approximately 4.9 million people, are the largest ethnic group in Senegal and form a minority in The Gambia and in Mauritania. The Wolof language is part of the...

Go to Oxford African American Studies Center »  home page

Sufism

Leyla Keough.

in Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, Second Edition

January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 957 words.

Derived from the Arabic suf, meaning wool, the term sufi was originally used to describe a type of ascetic Muslim who wore coarse woolen garb. Unlike Islamic law and theology, which...

Go to Oxford African American Studies Center »  home page