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Netta Syrett

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(d. 1943). Eldest daughter of ten in a well-off London family, she was educated at the North London Collegiate School for Girls, where she boarded in the house of the headmistress, Frances...

See overview in Oxford Index

Syrett, Janet [Netta] (1865–1943), writer and playwright

Jill Shefrin.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights); Literature. 1049 words.

Syrett, Janet [Netta] (1865–1943), writer and playwright, was born at 23 Harbour Street, Ramsgate, Kent, on 17 March 1865, the eldest of approximately eleven children born to Ernest Syrett (null...

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Netta Syrett

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(d. 1943). Eldest daughter of ten in a well-off London family, she was educated at the North London Collegiate School for Girls, where she boarded in the house of the headmistress, Frances...

See overview in Oxford Index

Syrett, Netta

in Who Was Who

P ublished online December 2007 .

Reference Entry. 164 words.

died 15 Dec. 1943

novelist

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Syrett, Netta (d. 1943)

Sandra Kemp, Charlotte Mitchell and David Trotter.

in The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

January 1997; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards). 377 words.

(d. 1943).

Eldest daughter of ten in a well-off London family, she was educated at the North London

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Bachelor girls, mistresses and the New Woman heroine

Emma Liggins.

in Odd women?

July 2014; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 15803 words.

Myths of the spinster as asexual, barren and dowdy are challenged in the second chapter, by an exploration of the figure of the New Woman or bachelor girl, and the alternative glamorous...

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Odd women?

Emma Liggins.

July 2014; p ublished online January 2015 .

Book. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 256 pages.

Women outside marriage between 1850 and the Second World War were seen as abnormal, threatening, superfluous and incomplete, whilst also being hailed as ‘women of the future’. Before 1850...

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