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Squamata

Overview page. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences.

; class Reptilia, subclass Lepidosauria)

A highly successful order which includes 95% of all living reptiles. The lizards and snakes are each given ordinal status in some...

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Squamata

Overview page. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences.

; class Reptilia, subclass Lepidosauria)

A highly successful order which includes 95% of all living reptiles. The lizards and snakes are each given ordinal status in some...

See overview in Oxford Index

Squamata

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 78 words.

An order of reptiles comprising the lizards and snakes. They appeared at the end of the Triassic period, about 170

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Squamata

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 89 words.

An order of reptiles comprising the lizards and snakes. They appeared at the end of the Triassic period, about 170

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Squamata

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Zoology

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences. 103 words.

A highly successful order which includes 95% of all living reptiles. The lizards and snakes are each given ordinal status

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Squamata

Edited by Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Zoology

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences. 101 words.

A highly successful order which includes 95% of all living reptiles. The lizards and snakes are each given ordinal status

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lorica squamata

Overview page. Subjects: Archaeology.

[Ar]

Latin term for a type of body armour worn by Roman legionaries, consisting of a cuirass made from shaped scales of iron and bronze riveted together.

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<i>lorica squamata</i>

Timothy Darvill.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Archaeology. 29 words.

[Ar]

Latin term for a type of body armour worn by Roman legionaries, consisting of a cuirass made from shaped

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A member of the <i>Roseobacter</i> clade, <i>Octadecabacter</i> sp., is the dominant symbiont in the brittle star <i>Amphipholis squamata</i>

Kathleen M Morrow, Abbey Rose Tedford, M Sabrina Pankey and Michael P Lesser.

in FEMS Microbiology Ecology

P ublished online February 2018 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Soil Science; Biotechnology; Genetics and Genomics; Microbiology; Molecular and Cell Biology. 4429 words.

Abstract

Symbiotic associations with subcuticular bacteria (SCB) have been identified and studied in many echinoderms, including the SCB of the brooding...

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Molecular Phylogenetics of Squamata: The Position of Snakes, Amphisbaenians, and Dibamids, and the Root of the Squamate Tree

Ted M. Townsend, Allan Larson, Edward Louis and J. Robert Macey.

Edited by Jack Sites.

in Systematic Biology

October 2004; p ublished online October 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Biological Sciences; Evolutionary Biology; Genetics and Genomics. 13931 words.

Squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards, and amphisbaenians) serve as model systems for evolutionary studies of a variety of morphological and behavioral traits, and phylogeny is crucial to many...

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Multiple Origins and Rapid Evolution of Duplicated Mitochondrial Genes in Parthenogenetic Geckos (<i>Heteronotia binoei</i>; Squamata, Gekkonidae)

Matthew K. Fujita, Jeffrey L. Boore and Craig Moritz.

in Molecular Biology and Evolution

December 2007; p ublished online October 2007 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Molecular and Cell Biology. 7828 words.

Accumulating evidence for alternative gene orders demonstrates that vertebrate mitochondrial genomes are more evolutionarily dynamic than previously thought. Several lineages of...

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