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affect

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A non-conscious, but intense, experience. Shouse (2005) MC J. 8, 6 explains that ‘feelings are personal and biographical, emotions are social, and affects are prepersonal’—in other words,...

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affect

Susan Mayhew.

in A Dictionary of Geography

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 194 words.

Some consider that affect describes a process of change within a person; this person is affected and can affect. However,

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affect

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 24 words.

attack, influence, move. XVII. — F. affecter or f. L. affect-, pp. stem of afficere act upon, influence, f.

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affective

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 98 words.

Pertaining to emotional effects or dispositions (known in psychology as ‘affects’). Affective criticism or affectivism evaluates literary works in terms

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affective

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 99 words.

Pertaining to emotional effects or dispositions (known in psychology as ‘affects’). Affective criticism or affectivism evaluates literary works in terms

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Affect

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 1461 words.

When Wimsatt and Beardsley published “The Affective Fallacy” in 1949, the term affective was not widespread in lit. crit.,

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affectable

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 11 words.

So spelled—not ✳affectible. See -able (a).

Current ratio: 6:1

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affect

John Scott and Gordon Marshall.

in A Dictionary of Sociology

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sociology. 100 words.

An affect is an emotion. In sociology the use of the term generally implies that an action is being or

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affect

Edited by John Scott.

in A Dictionary of Sociology

January 2014; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sociology. 116 words.

An affect is an emotion. In sociology the use of the term generally implies that an action is being or

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affect

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 618 words.

In ordinary usage, affect is always a verb; it means “to influence; to have an effect on.” Effect, as

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affect

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 41 words.

†aspire to XV; †have a liking for XVI; display or assume openly; assume or pretend falsely XVII. — F. affecter

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affect

Bryan A. Garner.

in The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 194 words.

In ordinary usage, affect is always a verb; it means “to influence; to have an effect on.” Effect, as

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affective

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 27 words.

Its affective quality is the feature of an experience which renders it pleasurable or desirable, or the reverse, or which

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affective

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 27 words.

Its affective quality is the feature of an experience which renders it pleasurable or desirable, or the reverse, or which

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affect

Overview page. Subjects: Media Studies.

1. v. To have an effect on (‘it affected me’).

2. n. The subjective or evaluative dimension in human experience (see also evaluati...

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Affect

Sean Alexander Gurd.

in Dissonance

July 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 17102 words.

The movement of sound across boundaries, and its ability to create extreme affect, is examined in Greek song and acoustic theory between Homer and the death of Euripides. Affect is defined...

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affective

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Pertaining to emotional effects or dispositions (known in psychology as ‘affects’). Affective criticism or affectivism evaluates literary works in terms of the feelings they arouse in...

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Affect

Marianne Liljeström.

in The Oxford Handbook of Feminist Theory

February 2016; p ublished online April 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Politics; Comparative Politics; Political Behaviour. 10896 words.

During the last few decades, feminist affect studies have enunciated challenging epistemological and ontological questions based on numerous discussions and readings of affect as emotive...

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affective

Overview page. Subjects: Philosophy.

Its affective quality is the feature of an experience which renders it pleasurable or desirable, or the reverse, or which gives it a distinctive emotional tone.

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affect

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 70 words.

n. (in psychiatry) 1. the predominant emotion in a person’s mental state at a particular moment. Blunted affect is a

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affect

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A non-conscious, but intense, experience. Shouse (2005) MC J. 8, 6 explains that ‘feelings are personal and biographical, emotions are social, and affects are prepersonal’—in other words,...

See overview in Oxford Index