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aggregation

Overview page. Subjects: Environmental Science.

1 The process of cementing or binding together of soil particles into an aggregate.

2 A method by which ice crystals grow around nuclei in the atmosphere,...

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aggregation

John Lackie.

in A Dictionary of Biomedicine

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Clinical Medicine. 26 words.

The formation of multisubunit complexes in which direct adhesion between the particles is involved, rather than an extrinsic linker. Aggregation

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aggregation

Carl Schaschke.

in A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

January 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Engineering and Technology. 19 words.

The formation of large groups of molecules or particles. With particles, aggregation consists of both *flocculation and *coagulation

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Aggregation

Paul Charbonneau.

in Natural Complexity

May 2017; p ublished online May 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 6015 words.

This chapter explores how naturally occurring inanimate structures grow by accretion of smaller-sized components, focusing on one specific accretion process: diffusion-limited aggregation...

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Moral Aggregation

Iwao Hirose.

November 2014; p ublished online November 2014 .

Book. Subjects: Moral Philosophy. 248 pages.

Aggregation is one of the fundamental features of utilitarianism and other forms of axiological theories, permitting the trade-off of morally relevant factors between different individuals....

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Judgment Aggregation <sup>*</sup>

Christian List and Clemens Puppe.

in The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice

January 2009; p ublished online May 2009 .

Chapter. Subjects: Public Economics. 10602 words.

The chapter surveys the recent and fast‐growing literature on the aggregation of logically interrelated propositions, following List and Pettit's formalization of the “doctrinal paradox”....

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Why Aggregation?

Iwao Hirose.

in Moral Aggregation

November 2014; p ublished online November 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Moral Philosophy. 4605 words.

This chapter motivates the analysis of aggregation and outlines the main arguments in this book. The section 1.1 presents an informal definition of aggregation and then elucidates that...

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Judgement Aggregation

Jon Williamson.

in In Defence of Objective Bayesianism

April 2010; p ublished online September 2010 .

Chapter. Subjects: Probability and Statistics. 5754 words.

Section. 8.1 introduces the problem of judgement aggregation and some of the difficulties encountered in trying to solve this problem. Section. 8.2 introduces the theory of belief revision...

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Molecular Aggregation

Angelo Gavezzotti.

November 2006; p ublished online January 2010 .

Book. Subjects: Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics. 448 pages.

Intermolecular interactions stem from the electric properties of atoms. Being the cause of molecular aggregation, intermolecular forces are at the roots of chemistry and are the fabric of...

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aggregation problem

Overview page. Subjects: Economics.

1 The conceptual difficulties encountered when an aggregate value is used to represent the total of individual values. Consider an economy with many firms, each of which uses...

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diffusion limited aggregation

Edited by John Daintith.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 33 words.

A process of aggregation dominated by particles diffusing and having a nonzero probability of sticking together irreversibly when they touch.

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