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amaranth

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

[Sp]

Flowering herb (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) with the flowers bunched together in long conspicuous racemes, native to Mexico and central America. Domesticated from c.4500 bc in...

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amaranth

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 50 words.

• amaranth • nth, tenth • eighteenth, fifteenth, fourteenth, nineteenth, seventeenth, sixteenth, thirteenth, umpteenth • plinth, synth

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amaranth

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 50 words.

• amaranth • nth, tenth • eighteenth, fifteenth, fourteenth, nineteenth, seventeenth, sixteenth, thirteenth, umpteenth • plinth, synth

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Amaranth

Cristina Mapes, Eduardo Espitia and Scott Sessions.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of the Americas. 602 words.

Also known as alegría, huauhtli (in Nahuatl), quiwicha, and quinua de castilla, among other names, amaranth is a

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The Amaranth Paradigm

Judith Misrahi-Barak.

in Caribbean Globalizations, 1492 to the Present Day

June 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of the Americas. 6360 words.

This chapter explores the varying uses of amaranth — a broad-leafed plant that can be consumed as a vegetable for its leaves but also produces cereal-like grain — from the pre-European...

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amaranth

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

[Sp]

Flowering herb (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) with the flowers bunched together in long conspicuous racemes, native to Mexico and central America. Domesticated from c.4500 bc in...

See overview in Oxford Index

amaranth

Overview page.

In poetic and literary usage, an imaginary flower that never fades, and is thus taken as a type of immortality; the name comes ultimately from Greek amarantos ‘unfading’.

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amaranth

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A burgundy red colour, stable to light (E123).

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amaranth

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 9 words.

A burgundy red colour, stable to light (E123).

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amaranth

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 9 words.

A burgundy red colour, stable to light (E123).

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Amaranth

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 124 words.

In Pliny the name of some real or imaginary fadeless flower. Clement of Alexandria (c.150–c.215 ad

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