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apricot

Overview page. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink — Medicine and Health.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g) is a source of vitamins A (as carotene) and C; provides 1.2 g of dietary...

See overview in Oxford Index

apricot

Overview page. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink — Medicine and Health.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g) is a source of vitamins A (as carotene) and C; provides 1.2 g of dietary...

See overview in Oxford Index

apricot

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 38 words.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g)

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apricot

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 36 words.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. A 40g serving

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apricot

Edited by John Ayto.

in An A-Z of Food and Drink

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 242 words.

The apricot has an involved linguistic history. The Romans called it praecocum, literally ‘the precocious one’, because of its

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apricot

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 19 words.

Mostly pronounced with initial /eɪ-/ in Britain, but mostly as /ˈaprɪkɒt/ in American English and sometimes in Scotland.

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apricot

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 16 words.

(the fruit) is pronounced /ay-pri-kot/ throughout the English-speaking world—/ap-ri-kot/ being a chiefly AmE variant.

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apricot

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 110 words.

allot, begot, Bernadotte, blot, bot, capot, clot, cocotte, cot, culotte, dot, forgot, garrotte (US garrote), gavotte, got,

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apricot

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 110 words.

allot, begot, Bernadotte, blot, bot, capot, clot, cocotte, cot, culotte, dot, forgot, garrotte (US garrote), gavotte, got,

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apricot

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 38 words.

XVI. Earliest forms abrecock, apricock — Pg. albricoque or Sp. albaricoque — Arab. albarḳūḳ, -birḳūḳ, i.e. AL-

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apricot

John Ayto.

in The Diner’s Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 242 words.

The apricot has an involved linguistic history. The Romans called it praecocum, literally ‘the precocious one’, because of its

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page