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apricot

Overview page. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink — Medicine and Health.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g) is a source of vitamins A (as carotene) and C; provides 1.2 g of dietary...

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apricot

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 38 words.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g)

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apricot

David A. Bender.

in A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 36 words.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. A 40g serving

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apricot

Edited by John Ayto.

in An A-Z of Food and Drink

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 242 words.

The apricot has an involved linguistic history. The Romans called it praecocum, literally ‘the precocious one’, because of its

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apricot

John Ayto.

in The Diner’s Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 242 words.

The apricot has an involved linguistic history. The Romans called it praecocum, literally ‘the precocious one’, because of its

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Apricots

Andrew Mariani.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 418 words.

The apricot (Prunus armeniaca), once thought to be native to Armenia, is actually indigenous to China, where it

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<span class="smallCaps">Apricots</span>

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 426 words.

The apricot (Prunus armeniaca), once thought to be native to Armenia, is actually indigenous to China, where it

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apricot

Overview page. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink — Medicine and Health.

Fruit of the deciduous tree Prunus armeniaca. Apricot kernels are used to prepare almond oil. One apricot (60 g) is a source of vitamins A (as carotene) and C; provides 1.2 g of dietary...

See overview in Oxford Index

apricot

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 113 words.

[M16th]

The Romans called the apricot the malum praecocum or ‘the apple that ripens early’. The second part of the

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apricot

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 19 words.

Mostly pronounced with initial /eɪ-/ in Britain, but mostly as /ˈaprɪkɒt/ in American English and sometimes in Scotland.

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apricot

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 16 words.

(the fruit) is pronounced /ay-pri-kot/ throughout the English-speaking world—/ap-ri-kot/ being a chiefly AmE variant.

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