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apron

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity.

The shortened form of cassock which is part of the distinctive dress of Anglican bishops, deans, and archdeacons. It is now seldom worn.

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apron

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 40 words.

1. Panel below a window-*cill, often enriched.

2. In an apron- or *curtain-wall, a *

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apron

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 29 words.

tied to someone's apron strings too much under the influence and control of someone (especially used to suggest that a

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apron

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 27 words.

XV. Evolved by misdivision of a napron as an apron (cf. ADDER); ME. napron, -(o)un (XIV) —

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apron

Edited by F. L. Cross and E. A. Livingstone.

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

January 2005; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Christianity. 58 words.

The ‘apron’ which is part of the traditional distinctive dress of Anglican bishops, deans, and archdeacons is really a shortened

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apron

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 46 words.

1 Panel below a window-cill, often carved and enriched.

2 In an apron- or curtain-wall, a spandrel or infill-panel

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apron

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 68 words.

[ME]

What we now call an apron was known in the Middle Ages as a naperon, from Old French nape

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apron

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

1 A strengthening timber used behind the lower part of the stem and above the foremost end of the keel of a wooden boat or ship. It takes the fastenings of the fore-hoods or...

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apron

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Panel below a window-cill, often carved and enriched.

2 In an apron- or curtain-wall, a spandrel or infill-panel between a window-cill above and a...

See overview in Oxford Index

WHITE APRON

Iona Opie and Moira Tatem.

in A Dictionary of Superstitions

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Popular Beliefs and Controversial Knowledge. 84 words.

1849 Norfolk Archaeology II 46 [Irstead] On our coast, if fishermen meet a woman with a white apron, when they

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Hottentot apron

Colin Blakemore and Sheila Jennett.

in The Oxford Companion to the Body

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 791 words.

In 1815, French anatomist Georges Cuvier declared, ‘there is nothing more celebrated in natural history than the Hottentot apron,

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