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avulsion

Overview page. Subjects: Law — Science and Mathematics.

The rapid and easily perceived increase in a parcel of land due to natural occurrences such as the sudden change in a river's course (cf accretion), which does not affect ...

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avulsion

Edited by John P. Grant and J. Craig Barker.

in Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: International Law. 121 words.

‘A distinction is drawn between accretion and avulsion, the former being the slow and gradual deposit of soil by alluvion

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avulsion fracture

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A fracture in which a tendon or ligament pulls off a portion of a bone. Explosive jumping and throwing movements can result in avulsion fractures of the ankle bone and humerus.

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epiphyseal avulsion

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A dramatic injury resulting in partial or complete detachment of the epiphysis from the rest of the bone. A complete avulsion is most common in boys 12–14 years old. It may occur during...

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Flexor digitorum profundus avulsion

Andrew Hodges.

in A-Z of Plastic Surgery

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 116 words.

• Forced avulsion from the insertion is the next common tendon injury after laceration. • FDS can be avulsed, but

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Flexor digitorum profundus avulsion

Overview page. Subjects: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Forced avulsion from the insertion is the next common tendon injury after laceration. FDS can be avulsed, but is rare. Most occur in the ring finger. A common muscle ...

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avulsion

Overview page. Subjects: Law — Science and Mathematics.

The rapid and easily perceived increase in a parcel of land due to natural occurrences such as the sudden change in a river's course (cf accretion), which does not affect ...

See overview in Oxford Index

avulsion

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

The detachment of a tooth from its socket due to trauma. It may be complete or partial. A completely avulsed tooth may be reimplanted. Prior to reimplantation, the root surface should not...

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avulsion

John Lackie.

in A Dictionary of Biomedicine

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Clinical Medicine. 3 words.

Tearing away.

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avulsion

Christopher Gorse, David Johnston and Martin Pritchard.

in A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Engineering and Technology. 14 words.

Sudden removal or loss of land by the action of water (a flood).

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avulsion

Edited by MICHAEL ALLABY.

in A Dictionary of Earth Sciences

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 47 words.

Lateral displacement of a stream from its main channel into a new course across its floodplain. Normally it is

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