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bogle

Overview page.

A variant on the terms ‘boggart’ and ‘bogy’, used for particularly frightening and evil specimens. Mrs Balfour said it was ‘a not uncommon theory’ in part of Lincolnshire that bogles are...

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Structured re-assessment system at 6 months after a disabling stroke: a randomised controlled trial with resource use and cost study

Anne Forster, John Young, John Green, Chris Patterson, Peter Wanklyn, Jane Smith, Jenni Murray, Heather Wild, Susan Bogle and Karin Lowson.

in Age and Ageing

September 2009; p ublished online June 2009 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Geriatric Medicine. 4273 words.

Background: national policy recommends routine re-assessment of disabled patients and their carers at 6 months after stroke onset. The clinical and resource outcomes of this...

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Post-acute transfer of older people to intermediate care services: the sooner the better?

John Young, Anne Forster, John Green and Sue Bogle.

in Age and Ageing

September 2007; p ublished online June 2007 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Geriatric Medicine. 2233 words.

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regional identities

Graeme Morton, Ian Olson, Kenneth Bogle and Brian Smith.

in The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

January 2001; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 3832 words.

1. general; 2. the north‐east; 3. the Borders (including the Common Ridings); 4. Orkney and Shetland.

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bogle

Overview page.

A variant on the terms ‘boggart’ and ‘bogy’, used for particularly frightening and evil specimens. Mrs Balfour said it was ‘a not uncommon theory’ in part of Lincolnshire that bogles are...

See overview in Oxford Index

bogle

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 111 words.

A variant on the terms ‘boggart’ and ‘bogy’, used for particularly frightening and evil specimens. Mrs Balfour said it was

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Bogle

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 70 words.

1. Scottish and northern Irish: nickname for a person of frightening appearance, from older Scots bogill ‘hobgoblin’, ‘bogy’ (of uncertain

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bogle

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 137 words.

draggle, gaggle, haggle, raggle-taggle, straggle, waggle • algal • angle, bangle, bespangle, dangle, entangle, fandangle, jangle, mangel,

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bogle

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 137 words.

draggle, gaggle, haggle, raggle-taggle, straggle, waggle • algal • angle, bangle, bespangle, dangle, entangle, fandangle, jangle, mangel,

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bogle

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 16 words.

see BOGEY. XVI; its use by Burns, Scott, and Hogg brought it into Eng. literature.

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Bogle

Patrick Hanks, Richard Coates and Peter McClure.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

November 2016; p ublished online November 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 169 words.

Current frequencies: GB 858, Ireland 212 • GB frequency 1881: 372 • Main GB location 1881: Lanarks • Main

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