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bovarysme

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

[bohv-ar-eezm]

A disposition towards escapist day dreaming in which one imagines oneself as a heroine or hero of a romance and refuses to acknowledge everyday realities. This...

See overview in Oxford Index

bovarysme

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

[bohv-ar-eezm]

A disposition towards escapist day dreaming in which one imagines oneself as a heroine or hero of a romance and refuses to acknowledge everyday realities. This...

See overview in Oxford Index

<i>bovarysme</i>

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 93 words.

A disposition towards escapist day dreaming in which one imagines oneself as a heroine or hero of a romance and

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<i>bovarysme</i>

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 93 words.

A disposition towards escapist day dreaming in which one imagines oneself as a heroine or hero of a *romance

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REFLECTIONS ON ‘BOVARYSME’: THE BOVARYS AT VAUBYESSARD

MARY ORR.

in French Studies Bulletin

January 1996 .

Journal Article. Subjects: European History; European Languages; Literary Studies (European). 0 words.

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Making Sense of Jack London’s Confusion of Genres in <i>The Sea-Wolf</i>

Per Serritslev Petersen.

in The Oxford Handbook of Jack London

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (20th Century onwards). 6882 words.

I discuss the philosophical significance of the generic confusions in Jack London’s novel The Sea-Wolf (1904). Drawing on a generous array of genres and scenarios, London asks his...

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Introduction to <i>Madame Bovary</i> (1965)

Martin McQuillan.

in The Paul De Man Notebooks

May 2014; p ublished online September 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 2907 words.

In this 1965 essay, Paul de Man talks about Madame Bovary, a novel by the French writer Gustave Flaubert. According to de Man, Madame Bovary has been one of the most discussed books in the...

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