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butterfly-ballot

Overview page. Subjects: Politics.

A confusing design of ballot paper in which the column for indicating preferences is located between two staggered lists of options, rather than left or right of a single list. This phrase...

See overview in Oxford Index

butterfly‐ballot

Paul Martin.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Politics. 60 words.

A confusing design of ballot paper in which the column for indicating preferences is located between two staggered lists of

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butterfly-ballot

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations

January 2018; p ublished online January 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Politics. 60 words.

A confusing design of ballot paper in which the column for indicating preferences is located between two staggered lists of

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butterfly-ballot

Overview page. Subjects: Politics.

A confusing design of ballot paper in which the column for indicating preferences is located between two staggered lists of options, rather than left or right of a single list. This phrase...

See overview in Oxford Index

Five Justices Decide the Election

Alan M. Dershowitz.

in Supreme Injustice

January 2003; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: US Politics. 11673 words.

Outlines the constitutional and statutory framework within which presidential elections are conducted in the USA. Provides a brief chronology and an account of the US (Bush vs Gore)...

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The Election of 2000 and Its Fallout

Tova Andrea Wang.

in The Politics of Voter Suppression

July 2012; p ublished online August 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: US Politics. 6219 words.

This chapter discusses voter disenfranchisement in the 2000 presidential elections. A large portion of the population believed (and still believes) that the election was “stolen,” first...

Go to Cornell University Press »  abstract