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chronotope

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A term employed by the Russian literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975) to refer to the co-ordinates of time and space invoked by a given narrative; in other words to the ‘setting’,...

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chronotope

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A term employed by the Russian literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975) to refer to the co-ordinates of time and space invoked by a given narrative; in other words to the ‘setting’,...

See overview in Oxford Index

chronotope

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 229 words.

Literally ‘time-place’, it denotes the intrinsic interconnection of these two dimensions, but also connotes an author's specific attitude to the

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chronotope

Susan Mayhew.

in A Dictionary of Geography

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 73 words.

At its most simple, the chronotope is the spatio‐temporal ‘setting’ of a given narrative. Thus, the genre ‘Western’ in cinema

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chronotope

Noel Castree, Rob Kitchin and Alisdair Rogers.

in A Dictionary of Human Geography

January 2013; p ublished online September 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Human Geography. 87 words.

The inseparability of time and space in life and representations of life. It was developed by literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin

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chronotope

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 38 words.

A term employed by the Russian literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975) to refer to the co-ordinates of time

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chronotope

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 38 words.

A term employed by the Russian literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975) to refer to the co-ordinates of time

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Chronotopes of Hell

Rachel Falconer.

in Hell in Contemporary Literature

October 2004; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards). 9504 words.

This chapter presents a more formalist approach to Hell, showing that however Hell is defined or whatever people think being in Hell means, the ideas are influenced by the conventions and...

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Chronotopes of a Dystopic Nation

Claudio Lomnitz.

in Globalizing American Studies

December 2010; p ublished online February 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 12073 words.

This chapter examines the early formation of the culture of dependent nationalism, a form of historical consciousness that fosters a pragmatic and immoral realism and which justifies...

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Fashioning the Neo-Ottoman Chronotope of Istanbul

Jeremy F. Walton.

in Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey

June 2017; p ublished online June 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Islam. 11165 words.

Chapter 5 extends the spatial and temporal concerns of chapters 3 and 4 by examining the “restorative nostalgia” that marks Sunni NGOs’ neo-Ottoman image of Istanbul. Following an excursion...

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“<i>Go</i> there tuh <i>know</i> there”: Zora Neale Hurston and the Chronotope of the Folk

Leigh Anne Duck.

in American Literary History

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies; United States History. 0 words.

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