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circus

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre.

In Roman times a place of exhibition for chariot racing and athletic and gladiatorial contests. In its modern sense it dates from the mid-18th century. Mainly itinerant, it is performed ...

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circus

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 51 words.

bread and circuses: see bread.

a three-ring circus

1 a circus with three rings for simultaneous performances.

2 a

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circus

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre.

In 1919 the Georgian artist Nikolai Foregger lectured the Union of International Artists of the Circus on his conviction in a renaissance of the circus. He evoked theatre as the ...

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circus

Mitch Mitchelson.

in The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

January 2006; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 1597 words.

In 1919 the Georgian artist Nikolai Foregger lectured the Union of International Artists of the Circus on his conviction in

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Circus

Laurence Senelick.

in The International Encyclopedia of Dance

January 1998; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Dance. 1774 words.

The mime Marcel Marceau once observed that “the circus and choreography, expressions of the same art, turn up their noses

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circus

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 326 words.

the Roman arena for chariot-racing. The most important at Rome was the Circus Maximus (c.650×125 m.: c.

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Circus

James D. Hart and Phillip W. Leininger.

in The Oxford Companion to American Literature

January 1995; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (American). 189 words.

traveling company of acrobats, clowns, and animals, who usually perform in tents. The modern circus originated in the English equestrian

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circus

Janet DeLaine.

in The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical History. 324 words.

the Roman arena for chariot-racing. The most important at Rome was the Circus Maximus (c.650 × 125 m.:

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circus

in The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

January 2014; p ublished online November 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical History. 314 words.

the Roman arena for chariot-racing. The most important at Rome was the Circus Maximus (c.650×125 m.: c.

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Circuses.

Janet Davis.

in The Oxford Companion to United States History

January 2001; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: United States History. 857 words.

The circus arrived in America in 1793, when the English rider John Bill Ricketts and his troupe held a

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<span class="smallCaps">Circuses</span>

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

January 2013; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Social and Cultural History. 893 words.

The circus arrived in America in 1793, when the English rider John Bill Ricketts and his troupe held a

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