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cockney

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A working-class native of the East End of London, traditionally within earshot of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church, and the associated dialect of English, incorporating the glottal stop...

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cockney

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 111 words.

[LME]

A cockney was originally a pampered or spoilt child. This use may derive from a similar word, cokeney ‘a

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cockney <i>n</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 5 words.

ˈkɒknǝɪ

sp cockney2

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Cockney <i>adj.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 197 words.

used in combs. based on Cockney stereotypes.

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Cockney School

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century).

A term apparently first used in Blackwood's Magazine in Oct. 1817, when Lockhart and his associates began a series of attacks ‘On the Cockney School of Poetry’. Leigh Hunt was the chief...

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The Music Hall Cockney

Derek B. Scott.

in Sounds of the Metropolis

September 2008; p ublished online September 2008 .

Chapter. Subjects: Musicology and Music History. 7854 words.

This chapter argues that from the 1840s to the 1890s the representation of the Cockney in music hall went through three successive phases. It began as a parody of working-class life; then...

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A Cockney Catullus

Henry Stead.

November 2015; p ublished online December 2015 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature. 368 pages.

This book traces the reception history of Catullus in Romantic-era Britain. It was in this turbulent period of British history that Catullus’ whole book of poems was first translated into...

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cockney

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A working-class native of the East End of London, traditionally within earshot of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church, and the associated dialect of English, incorporating the glottal stop...

See overview in Oxford Index

cockney

Edited by Russ Willey.

in Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 1345 words.

A Londoner, especially one born within (the) sound of Bow bells. Adjectivally, the word can mean ‘pertaining

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Cockney

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 548 words.

A Londoner, especially one born within sound of bow bells. Adjectivally, the word can mean ‘pertaining to London, or

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Cockney

Edited by Tom McArthur.

in Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 3371 words.

A working-class Londoner, especially in the East End, and English as used by such a Londoner. Though often stigmatized as

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