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counterspells

Overview page.

Some traditional measures against witchcraft were general defences, e.g. horseshoes, hagstones, various plants hung at the door, the sign of the cross, a bent coin laid in the churn, etc....

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counterspells

Overview page.

Some traditional measures against witchcraft were general defences, e.g. horseshoes, hagstones, various plants hung at the door, the sign of the cross, a bent coin laid in the churn, etc....

See overview in Oxford Index

counterspells

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 733 words.

Some traditional measures against witchcraft were general defences, e.g. horseshoes, hagstones, various plants hung at the door, the

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hearts and pins

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 304 words.

Sticking pins into an animal's heart is a symbolic aggressive action, much used in counterspells throughout England. If farm animals

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witch bottles

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 609 words.

A common counterspell against illness caused by witchcraft was to put the sick person's urine (and sometimes also hair and

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hearts and pins

Overview page.

Sticking pins into an animal's heart is a symbolic aggressive action, much used in counterspells throughout England. If farm animals were dying and witchcraft was suspected, one should cut...

See overview in Oxford Index

cunning men, women

Overview page.

From the medieval period almost to the present day, there have been people who were employed by others to practise magical skills on their behalf, and were paid in money or small gifts,...

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witch bottles

Overview page.

A common counterspell against illness caused by witchcraft was to put the sick person's urine (and sometimes also hair and fingernail clippings) in a bottle with nails, pins, or threads,...

See overview in Oxford Index