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dentil-band

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Plain moulding of square or rectangular section forming part of the bed-mouldings of an entablature, that could be cut to form dentils, but is left as a band, as on Scamozzi's version of...

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dentil-band

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Plain moulding of square or rectangular section forming part of the bed-mouldings of an entablature, that could be cut to form dentils, but is left as a band, as on Scamozzi's version of...

See overview in Oxford Index

dentil-band

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 37 words.

Plain moulding of square or rectangular section forming part of the bed-mouldings of an entablature, that could be cut

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Venetian dentil

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Common medieval moulding in Venice consisting of a projecting band with its upper and lower parts cut alternately into notches sloping to the middle of the band, producing the effect of a...

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Dentil

in Grove Art Online

August 1996; p ublished online January 1998 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Art. 53 words.

Term for an ornamental band of small, square, toothlike blocks in the bed-mould of a cornice (see Greece, ancient, §II, 1(i)(a), and Orders, architectural, fig.xxv; see also Polychromy,...

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band

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Flat raised horizontal strip on a façade, occasionally ornamented, sometimes coinciding with cills or floor-levels, also called a band-course, band-moulding, belt-course, or null...

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Ionic order

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Classical Order of architecture, the second Greek and the third Roman. It is primarily identified by its capital, with its rolled-up cushion-like form on either side creating the...

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