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desiccate

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Dentistry.

To dry by physical or chemical means. It can occur in glass-ionomer restorations when isolated from contact with saliva.

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desiccate

Elizabeth Martin.

in The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 10 words.

Noun form: desiccation. Derived nouns: desiccator, desiccant.

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desiccator

Edited by Richard Cammack, Teresa Atwood, Peter Campbell, Howard Parish, Anthony Smith, Frank Vella and John Stirling.

in Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

January 2006; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biochemistry. 8 words.

an apparatus in which to effect desiccation.

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desiccator

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 37 words.

A container for drying substances or for keeping them free from moisture. Simple laboratory desiccators are glass vessels containing a

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desiccator

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 37 words.

A container for drying substances or for keeping them free from moisture. Simple laboratory desiccators are glass vessels containing a

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desiccator

Edited by John Daintith.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 37 words.

A container for drying substances or for keeping them free from moisture. Simple laboratory desiccators are glass vessels containing a

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desiccation

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

A method of preserving organic material by the removal of its water content. Cells and tissues can be preserved by desiccation after lowering the samples to freezing temperatures;...

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desiccator

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Biological Sciences.

A container for drying substances or for keeping them free from moisture. Simple laboratory desiccators are glass vessels containing a drying agent, such as silica gel. They can be...

See overview in Oxford Index

desiccation

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 37 words.

A method of preserving organic material by the removal of its water content. Cells and tissues can be preserved by desiccation after lowering the samples to freezing temperatures;...

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desiccator

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 37 words.

A container for drying substances or for keeping them free from moisture. Simple laboratory desiccators are glass vessels containing a drying agent, such as silica gel. They can be...

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desiccation cracks

Overview page. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation — Earth Sciences and Geography.

The polygonal-shaped cracks developed in mud which has dried out in a terrestrial environment. They are most often preserved when loose sand infills the cracks and then buries the...

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desiccation cracks

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

P ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 40 words.

The polygonal-shaped cracks developed in mud which has dried out in a terrestrial environment. They are most often preserved when loose sand infills the cracks and then buries the...

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desiccation cracks

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences

January 2013; p ublished online September 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 42 words.

The polygonal-shaped cracks developed in mud which has dried out in a terrestrial environment. They are most often preserved when loose sand infills the cracks and then buries the...

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Wordsworth's Desiccation

Thomas McFarland.

in William Wordsworth: Intensity and Achievement

February 1992; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century). 3167 words.

This chapter discusses the melancholy quantity of desiccated verse used by Wordsworth. There have been many previous discussions on the subject, but the discussions in this chapter attempt...

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desiccate

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Dentistry.

To dry by physical or chemical means. It can occur in glass-ionomer restorations when isolated from contact with saliva.

See overview in Oxford Index

desiccation

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 37 words.

A method of preserving organic material by the removal of its water content. Cells and tissues can be preserved by

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desiccation

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 37 words.

A method of preserving organic material by the removal of its water content. Cells and tissues can be preserved by

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desiccation

Carl Schaschke.

in A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

January 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Engineering and Technology. 90 words.

The process of drying and removing the moisture within a material. It involves the use of a drying agent known as a ...

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desiccation

Edited by John Daintith.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 37 words.

A method of preserving organic material by the removal of its water content. Cells and tissues can be preserved by

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desiccation

Edited by MICHAEL ALLABY.

in A Dictionary of Earth Sciences

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 10 words.

Long-term loss of water associated with regional climatic change.

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desiccation

Michael Allaby.

in A Dictionary of Ecology

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation. 25 words.

1 A long-term loss of water that is associated with regional climatic change.

2 The drying-out of an organism that

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