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deus ex machina

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(Latin, god from the machine)

The phrase refers to the theatrical device whereby a supernatural agency is introduced to solve the dramatic situation; hence, any artificial,...

See overview in Oxford Index

“Has this thing appeared again tonight?”: Deus Ex Machina and Other Theatrical Interventions of the Supernatural

Freddie Rokem.

in Things

September 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 5057 words.

The appearance of the supernatural on the theatrical stage as well as on the movie screen, in particular through a deus ex machina, but also in the form of ghosts or dybbuks, is still, even...

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deus ex machina

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(Latin, god from the machine)

The phrase refers to the theatrical device whereby a supernatural agency is introduced to solve the dramatic situation; hence, any artificial,...

See overview in Oxford Index

Deus ex machina

F.W. Sternfeld.

in Grove Music Online

December 1992; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 1507 words.

A term used by historians of drama to denote a god who by a theatrical machine (Gk. mechane, Lat. machina) is hoisted on to the stage to resolve the plot, to ‘untie the knot’ (dénouement)....

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deus ex machina

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 126 words.

abstainer, arcana, campaigner, Cana, caner, cantilena, complainer, container, detainer, drainer, entertainer, explainer, Gaenor, gainer, Gaynor, grainer, Jena, Lena,

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deus ex machina

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 126 words.

abstainer, arcana, campaigner, Cana, caner, cantilena, complainer, container, detainer, drainer, entertainer, explainer, Gaenor, gainer, Gaynor, grainer, Jena, Lena,

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deus ex machina

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 51 words.

(‘God from the machine’),

an unexpected event or intervention in a play or novel, which resolves a difficult situation. When

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deus ex machina

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 47 words.

[Latin for ‘a god from the machine’] 

A god in Greek drama swung in by a crane to resolve a problem in the plot, especially in ...

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Deus ex Machina

Phyllis Hartnoll and Peter Found.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 84 words.

literally ‘the god from the machine’, in classical drama the character, usually a god, who enters at the end of

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Deus ex machina

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 42 words.

(Lat., ‘God out of the machine’).

The device in classical theatre of bringing God on to the stage and into

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deus ex machina

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 47 words.

A god in Greek drama swung in by a crane to resolve a problem in the plot, especially in *...

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deus ex machina

in The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 95 words.

a ‘god from a machine’, lowered mechanically to the stage in some of Euripides' plays to untangle the plot. The

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deus ex machina

in The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

January 2015; p ublished online October 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 96 words.

a ‘god from a machine’, lowered mechanically to the stage in some of Euripides’ plays to untangle the plot. The

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deus ex machina

in The Oxford Companion to Theatre and Performance

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 113 words.

Literally, ‘god from the machine’ in Latin, the term derives from the ancient *Greek practice of having gods arrive on

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<i>deus ex machina</i>

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 122 words.

The ‘god from a machine’ who was lowered on to the stage by mechanical contrivance in some ancient Greek plays

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<i>deus ex machina</i>

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 122 words.

The ‘god from a machine’ who was lowered on to the stage by mechanical contrivance in some ancient Greek plays

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<i>deus ex machina</i>

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 38 words.

The phrase refers to the theatrical device whereby a supernatural agency is introduced to solve the dramatic situation; hence, any

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<i>deus ex machina</i>

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 38 words.

The phrase refers to the theatrical device whereby a supernatural agency is introduced to solve the dramatic situation; hence, any

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deus ex machina

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 64 words.

an unexpected power or event saving a seemingly hopeless situation, especially as a contrived plot device in a play or novel. The phrase is modern Latin, a direct translation of Greek ...

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deus ex machina

Ronald W. Vince.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 112 words.

Literally, ‘god from the machine’ in Latin, the term derives from the ancient Greek practice of having gods arrive on

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Deus ex Machina: Concluding Remarks

Yehouda Shenhav.

in Manufacturing Rationality

March 2002; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Organizational Theory and Behaviour. 7706 words.

This chapter summarizes the genealogy of management ideology from the Civil War until the Great Depression, and emphasizes the conflictive biography of management rhetoric and practice. It...

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