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encephalization

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The increasing anatomical sophistication of the developing brain, beginning with the spinal cord and brainstem, followed by midbrain and forebrain regions, with the cerebral cortex, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

encephalization

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The increasing anatomical sophistication of the developing brain, beginning with the spinal cord and brainstem, followed by midbrain and forebrain regions, with the cerebral cortex, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

encephalization quotient

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences — Psychology.

(EQ)

A measure of the relative size of the brain of a particular species compared with the expected value for members of the group to which it belongs. It is used to estimate the...

See overview in Oxford Index

encephalization quotient

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 150 words.

A measure of the relative size of the brain of a particular species compared with the expected value for members

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encephalization quotient

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 150 words.

A measure of the relative size of the brain of a particular species compared with the expected value for members

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encephalization <i>n.</i>

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 61 words.

The increasing anatomical sophistication of the developing brain, beginning with the spinal cord and brainstem, followed by midbrain and forebrain

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encephalization <i>n.</i>

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 61 words.

The increasing anatomical sophistication of the developing brain, beginning with the spinal cord and brainstem, followed by midbrain and forebrain

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encephalization quotient <i>n.</i>

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 96 words.

An index of the comparative intelligence of animal species formulated by the Polish-born US psychologist Harry Jacob Jerison (born 1925

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encephalization quotient <i>n.</i>

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 96 words.

An index of the comparative *intelligence of animal species formulated by the Polish-born US psychologist Harry Jacob Jerison (born

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A novel transgenic mouse model of fetal encephalization and craniofacial development

Elisabeth K. N. López, Stuart R. Stock, Makoto Mark Taketo, Anjen Chenn and Matthew J. Ravosa.

in Integrative and Comparative Biology

September 2008; p ublished online July 2008 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 6354 words.

There are surprisingly few experimental models of neural growth and cranial integration. This, and the dearth of information regarding fetal brain development, detracts from a mechanistic...

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Humans Rule!

Suzana Herculano-Houzel.

in The Human Advantage

April 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Neuroscience. 6278 words.

The previous view of evolution as progress, and humans as its apex; the larger-than-it-should-be human brain; humans as outliers; encephalization as the key to what makes humans special –...

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