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end-rhyme

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Rhyme occurring at the ends of verse lines, as opposed to internal rhyme and ‘head-rhyme’ (alliteration); the most familiar kind of rhyming.

See overview in Oxford Index

end-rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 24 words.

Rhyme occurring at the ends of verse lines, as opposed to internal rhyme and ‘head-rhyme’ (alliteration); the most

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end-rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 24 words.

Rhyme occurring at the ends of verse lines, as opposed to *internal rhyme and ‘head-rhyme’ (*alliteration);

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end-rhyme

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Rhyme occurring at the ends of verse lines, as opposed to internal rhyme and ‘head-rhyme’ (alliteration); the most familiar kind of rhyming.

See overview in Oxford Index

<i>qāfiya</i>

Marlé Hammond.

in A Dictionary of Arabic Literary Terms and Devices

February 2018; p ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies - World. 287 words.

Rhyme. Traditionally, a rhyme may end with a consonant, in which case it is called ‘fettered’ (muqayyada), or,

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Nursery Rhymes

Lucy Rollin.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1039 words.

The term “nursery rhyme” vidently did not appear until toward the end of the nineteenth century, but the rhymes themselves

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Odl

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 311 words.

Both end rhyme and *internal rhyme are features of *Welsh poetry from its origins in the 6th c.

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Triple Rhyme

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 307 words.

Three consecutive syllables at the end of two or more lines that rhyme. Rhyming more than two syllables in sequence

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Virelay

Edited by Douglas Gray.

in The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval). 44 words.

a French lyric form usually consisting of short lines arranged in stanzas with only two rhymes, the end-rhyme of one

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Monorhyme

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 440 words.

Refers to a passage, stanza, or entire poem in which all lines have the same end rhyme, i.e., the rhyme

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Children's Overture, A

Michael Kennedy and Joyce Bourne Kennedy.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 29 words.

Orch. work by Quilter, 1914, based on nursery‐rhymes. Intended as ov. to play ‘Where the Rainbow Ends’, for

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monorhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 30 words.

A poem or poetic passage in which every line ends on the same rhyme; rare in English, but found more

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broken rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 81 words.

The splitting of a word (not in fact of the rhyme) at the end of a verse line, to allow

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masculine rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 79 words.

The commonest kind of rhyme, between single stressed syllables (e.g. delay/stay) at the ends of verse

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masculine rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 79 words.

The commonest kind of rhyme, between single stressed syllables (e.g. delay/stay) at the ends of verse

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broken rhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 81 words.

The splitting of a word (not in fact of the rhyme) at the end of a verse line, to allow

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monorhyme

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 45 words.

A poem or poetic passage in which every line ends on the same rhyme; found more commonly in Welsh, in

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puk

Tony Deverson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealandisms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 23 words.

noun (rhymes with took) informal short for puku. 1962 mason End of the Golden Weather ‘Look at that

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Clavis

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 140 words.

Dante describes clavis as the end of a line of verse that has no matching rhyme within the stanza, though

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Internal Rhyme

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 569 words.

Refers to the Eng. cover term for a variety of rhymes that occur not at the end of the line

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Broken Rhyme

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 369 words.

Broken rhyme usually designates the division by hyphenation of a word at the end of a line in order to

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