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energizer

Overview page. Subjects: Computing.

A hardware or software mechanism that is used as an aid in testing the behavior of a subsystem. The intention is that the energizer should drive the subsystem in a way that simulates its...

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energizer

Overview page. Subjects: Computing.

A hardware or software mechanism that is used as an aid in testing the behavior of a subsystem. The intention is that the energizer should drive the subsystem in a way that simulates its...

See overview in Oxford Index

energizing technique

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 56 words.

A technique for increasing arousal. Energizing techniques are used by athletes when they are not psyched-up enough for their

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energizing technique

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A technique for increasing arousal. Energizing techniques are used by athletes when they are not psyched-up enough for their activity and competition. They may also be used to overcome...

See overview in Oxford Index

energizer <i>n.</i> (<i>drugs</i>)

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 34 words.

1 phencyclidine.

1984 Abel Dict. Drug Abuse Terms. 2001 ONDCP Street Terms 8: Energizer — PCP.

2 MDMA.

null...

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Cognitive and Energizing Virtues

Arménio Rego, Miguel Pina e Cunha and Stewart Clegg.

in The Virtues of Leadership

July 2012; p ublished online September 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Organizational Theory and Behaviour. 13877 words.

This chapter discusses how cognitive and energizing virtues (wisdom/knowledge and courage) enable global leaders to interpret the complexity of the world and to energetically face its...

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energizer

Edited by Andrew Butterfield and Gerard Ekembe Ngondi.

in A Dictionary of Computer Science

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Computing. 56 words.

A hardware or software mechanism that is used as an aid in testing the behaviour of a subsystem. The intention

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energizer

John Daintith and Edmund Wright.

in A Dictionary of Computing

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Computing. 56 words.

A hardware or software mechanism that is used as an aid in testing the behavior of a subsystem. The intention

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On particle energization in accretion flows

Eric G. Blackman.

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

February 1999; p ublished online February 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 6007 words.

Abstract

Two-temperature advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or hot ion tori (HIT) models help to explain low-luminosity stellar and galactic accreting...

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The Breath of Prayer energizing godly love

Matthew T. Lee, Margaret M. Poloma and Stephen G. Post.

in The Heart of Religion

December 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 12802 words.

This chapter describes how godly love is energized through prayer that seemingly releases what sociologist Pitirim Sorokin has called “love energy.” As shown by survey statistics and...

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Energizing the last phase of common-envelope removal

Noam Soker.

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

P ublished online August 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 4900 words.

Abstract

We propose a scenario where a companion that is about to exit a common-envelope evolution (CEE) with a giant star accretes mass from the remaining...

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