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Fiction

Margaret Cohen, John B. Hattendorf and Dennis Berthold.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Maritime History. 14182 words.

This entry contains three subentries: Historical Fiction, Naval Novel, Sea Fiction

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fictive

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 28 words.

• active • captive • festive, restive • dative, native, stative • fictive • unitive • octave •

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fictive

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 28 words.

• active • captive • festive, restive • dative, native, stative • fictive • unitive • octave •

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fiction

Edited by Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Law

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 111 words.

An assumption that something is true irrespective of whether it is really true or not. In English legal history fictions

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fiction

Graham Gooch and Michael Williams.

in A Dictionary of Law Enforcement

P ublished online January 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Policing. 110 words.

An assumption that something is true irrespective of whether it is really true or not. In English legal history, fictions

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fiction

Graham Gooch and Michael Williams.

in A Dictionary of Law Enforcement

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Policing. 110 words.

An assumption that something is true irrespective of whether it is really true or not. In English legal history, fictions

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<b>FICTION</b>

in Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 262 words.

“Fiction” comes from fingo (in the supine, fictum), whose proper meaning is “to model in clay,” like the Greek

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Fiction

in Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

January 2014; p ublished online August 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 4354 words.

To explore the concept of fiction in the history of aesthetics, this entry consists of two essays: Overview Modern Literary

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Fiction

Peter McCormick, Wolfgang Iser and Catherine Wilson.

in Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

January 1998; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 7060 words.

To explore the concept of fiction in the history of aesthetics, this entry comprises three essays: Historical and Conceptual Overview

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fiction

Anthony Wall.

in Encyclopedia of Semiotics

January 1998; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 1413 words.

Fictional discourse puts several fundamental assumptions about language at risk. When dealing with fiction, the semiotician must grapple at the

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