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glasses, drinking

Overview page.

A relatively recent idea is that a ringing glass is connected to drowning sailors. The first documented reference so far found is in 1909 (N&Q 10s: 12 (1909), 310), but it was certainly...

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glasses, drinking

Overview page.

A relatively recent idea is that a ringing glass is connected to drowning sailors. The first documented reference so far found is in 1909 (N&Q 10s: 12 (1909), 310), but it was certainly...

See overview in Oxford Index

horses and asses <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 21 words.

drinking glasses.

2001 G. Coughlan Everyday Eng. and Sl. [Internet] horses and asses: glasses.

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glass armonica

Michael Kennedy and Joyce Bourne Kennedy.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 173 words.

Obsolete mus. instr., also known as ‘musical glasses’, comprising either (a) drinking glasses filled with water to different heights in

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forward (pass) <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 21 words.

a beer or wine glass.

1999 G. Seal Lingo 91: forward passes are glasses (drinking).

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Kosta Boda (1741)

Jonathan M. Woodham.

in A Dictionary of Modern Design

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Industrial and Commercial Art. 199 words.

For much of its early life this famous Swedish glassmaking company's production centred on drinking glasses, chandeliers, and window panes.

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Bottoms up!

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 24 words.

A drinking toast of naval origin. The bottoms are those of the glasses as they are tilted up over the

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all nations <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 128 words.

1 a mixture of drinks assembled from the dregs of bottles and glasses.

1785, 1788, 1796 Grose Classical Dict. of

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chin chin <i>int</i>

Edited by John Ayto and John Simpson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang

January 2008; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 32 words.

Brit Used as a drinking toast, a greeting, etc. 1795–. P. Jones Two glasses appeared, with ice tinkling in

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jolt <i>noun</i>

Edited by John Ayto and John Simpson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang

January 2008; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 88 words.

1 mainly US A drink of liquor. 1904–. R. Thomas She took two green plastic glasses.…I poured a generous

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Cordial glass

Edited by Gordon Campbell.

in The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design. 33 words.

Type of drinking glass popular in 18th-century England, when it was used to drink gin and fruit liqueurs; the glasses

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Kosta Boda (1741)

Edited by Jonathan M. Woodham.

in A Dictionary of Modern Design

P ublished online May 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Industrial and Commercial Art. 199 words.

For much of its early life this famous Swedish glassmaking company’s production centred on drinking glasses, chandeliers, and window panes.

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hob nob <i>v.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 396 words.

to invite to drink and then to clink glasses; thus hob nob/hob a nob, a toast.

1763 G.A. Stevens

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drinking vessels

in The Oxford Companion to Wine

January 2006; p ublished online August 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 1868 words.

Before the development of glass-making enabled the production of glasses (the most common modern wine drinking vessels), a wide variety

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drinking vessels

in The Oxford Companion to Wine

January 2015; p ublished online November 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 1903 words.

Before the development of glass-making enabled the production of glasses (the most common modern wine drinking vessels), a wide variety

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Cordial glass

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design.

Type of drinking glass popular in 18th-century England, when it was used to drink gin and fruit liqueurs; the glasses have small bowls (either flute-shaped or cup-shaped) on proportionately...

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Cordial glass

Gordon Campbell.

in Grove Art Online

August 1996; p ublished online October 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Art. 40 words.

Type of drinking glass popular in 18th-century England, when it was used to drink gin and fruit liqueurs; the glasses have small bowls (either flute-shaped or cup-shaped) on proportionately...

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Waterford

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design — European History.

Irish centre of glass production. The earliest Waterford glass factory was established in Gurteens, near Waterford, during the 1720s, and production included lead-glass drinking vessels...

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Willem Jacob van Heemskerk

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design.

(b 1613; d 1692).

Dutch cloth-merchant, poet, dramatist and glass-engraver in Leiden. He added edifying sayings and short poems to bottles, plates and drinking glasses; his...

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Environmental Interventions to Reduce Overeating in Children

Thomas N. Robinson and Donna M. Matheson.

in Food and Addiction

August 2012; p ublished online July 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Clinical Psychology. 3499 words.

Chapter 58 considers environmental interventions to reduce overeating in children. It discusses portion size and overeating (including the size of dinnerware and glasses), availability,...

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Jacobite glass

Overview page. Subjects: Art.

Wine-glasses engraved with decoration to show support for the Jacobite bid for the throne, first produced in 1688 and in large quantities after 1745. They were used for drinking loyal...

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