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gorgerin

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Collarino, gorge, hypotrachelium, or neck separating a capital from a shaft, such as the frieze-like collar above the astragal and below the annulets and echinus of the Roman Doric Order.

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gorgerin

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Collarino, gorge, hypotrachelium, or neck separating a capital from a shaft, such as the frieze-like collar above the astragal and below the annulets and echinus of the Roman Doric Order.

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

gorgerin

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 31 words.

Collarino, gorge, hypotrachelium, or neck separating a capital from a shaft, such as the frieze-like collar

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gorge

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 81 words.

1. Shallow part-elliptical *cavetto.

2. *Neck (gorgerin) of a column-*shaft at the top,

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gorge

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 27 words.

1 Shallow part-elliptical cavetto.

2 Neck (gorgerin) of a column-shaft at the top, as in the Tuscan

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gorge

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Shallow part-elliptical cavetto.

2 Neck (gorgerin) of a column-shaft at the top, as in the Tuscan and Roman Doric Orders.

3 Cyma.

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hypotrachelion

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

In Classical architecture, a member or part between the capital proper and the shaft of an Order, meaning literally ‘below the neck’ or the ‘lower part of the neck’. Its exact meaning seems...

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