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Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and a sea nymph, Eurynome. They were three in number—Aglaia, Euprosyne, and Thalia,...

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Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and a sea nymph, Eurynome. They were three in number—Aglaia, Euprosyne, and Thalia,...

See overview in Oxford Index

Graces

Overview page. Subjects: European History.

Concessions promised to Irish interest groups by Charles I but left largely unratified. The Old English used the war with Spain in 1625 to request concessions in return for subsidies. ...

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graces

Overview page.

Be in someone's good (or bad) graces be regarded by someone with favour (or disfavour).

See also the Three Graces at three.

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Graces

Edited by John Roberts.

in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 3 words.

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Graces

Edited by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth.

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 3 words.

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Graces

Edited by Esther Eidinow.

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 3 words.

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Graces

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 39 words.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and

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graces

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 23 words.

be in someone's good (or bad) graces be regarded by someone with favour (or disfavour).

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Graces

in World Encyclopedia

P ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: General Studies. 38 words.

In Greek mythology, three goddesses who represented intellectual pleasures: beauty, grace, and charm. Associated especially with poetry, Aglaia, Euphrosyne and

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Expectative Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Expectatives were pontifical graces issued to petitioning clerics and enjoining the ordinary collators to deliver to them the first Benefice of a certain nature and a certain value that...

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