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high-speed steel

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed lathes. It usually contains 12–22% tungsten, up to 5% chromium, and 0.4–0.7% carbon....

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high-speed steel

Edited by John Daintith.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 49 words.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed

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high-speed steel

in A Dictionary of Physics

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 49 words.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed

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high-speed steel

Edited by Jonathan Law and Richard Rennie.

in A Dictionary of Physics

January 2015; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 49 words.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed

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high-speed steel

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed lathes. It usually contains 12–22% tungsten, up to 5% chromium, and 0.4–0.7% carbon....

See overview in Oxford Index

high-speed steel

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 47 words.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed lathes. It usually contains 12–22% tungsten, up to 5% chromium, and 0.4–0.7% carbon....

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high-speed steel

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Physics

March 2019; p ublished online March 2019 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 47 words.

A steel that will remain hard at dull red heat and can therefore be used in cutting tools for high-speed lathes. It usually contains 12–22% tungsten, up to 5% chromium, and 0.4–0.7% carbon....

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cutter block

Christopher Gorse, David Johnston and Martin Pritchard.

in A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Engineering and Technology. 26 words.

A steel block housing two or more knives that is fitted to woodcarving machines. It rotates at high speeds to

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basic-oxygen process

Edited by John Daintith.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 86 words.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz-Donawitz (L-D) process. Molten pig iron

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basic-oxygen process

in A Dictionary of Physics

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 89 words.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz–Donawitz (L–D) process. Molten pig iron

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basic-oxygen process

Edited by Jonathan Law and Richard Rennie.

in A Dictionary of Physics

January 2015; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 88 words.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz–Donawitz (L–D) process. Molten pig iron

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Pickworth, Sir Frederick

in Who Was Who

P ublished online December 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Business Finance. 53 words.

Kt 1957

Born 7 May 1890; died 14 July 1959

Chairman: English Steel Corporation Limited and of its Principal subsidiary Companies; Chairman: Security Rock...

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cobalt steel

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.

Any of a group of alloy steels containing 5–12% of cobalt, 14–20% of tungsten, usually with 4% of chromium and 1–2% of vanadium. They are very hard but somewhat brittle. Their main use is...

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cobalt steel

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 40 words.

Any of a group of alloy *steels containing 5–12% of cobalt, 14–20% of tungsten, usually with 4% of chromium and 1–2% of vanadium. They are very hard but somewhat brittle. Their main use is...

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cobalt steel

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Physics

March 2019; p ublished online March 2019 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 40 words.

Any of a group of alloy *steels containing 5–12% of cobalt, 14–20% of tungsten, usually with 4% of chromium and 1–2% of vanadium. They are very hard but somewhat brittle. Their main use is...

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basic-oxygen process

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz-Donawitz (L-D) process. Molten pig iron and scrap are charged into a tilting furnace, similar to the Bessemer...

See overview in Oxford Index

basic-oxygen process

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Chemistry

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Chemistry. 90 words.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz–Donawitz (L–D) process. Molten pig iron and scrap are charged into a tilting furnace, similar to the Bessemer...

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basic-oxygen process

Edited by Richard Rennie and Jonathan Law.

in A Dictionary of Physics

March 2019; p ublished online March 2019 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Physics. 90 words.

A high-speed method of making high-grade steel. It originated in the Linz–Donawitz (L–D) process. Molten pig iron and scrap are charged into a tilting furnace, similar to the Bessemer...

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Evaluation of Grinding Aerosols in Terms of Alveolar Dose: The Significance of Using Mass, Surface Area and Number Metrics

A. D. Maynard and A. T. Zimmer.

in The Annals of Occupational Hygiene

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Occupational Medicine. 0 words.

Aerosols generated by mechanical means are generally assumed to have low particle number and surface area concentrations compared with mass concentration. As a result, they have received...

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Nazi Germany’s Struggle for Spanish Wolfram and Allied Economic Warfare

Christian Leitz.

in Economic Relations between Nazi Germany and Franco’s Spain 1936–1945

October 1996; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945). 12882 words.

This chapter focuses on Germany's dependence on certain Spanish products, most notably wolfram, wool, and hides. It notes that the value of Germany's exports to Spain could not keep up with...

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SeaCat

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

A high-speed (40–5 knot) catamaran ferry capable of carrying vehicles as well as passengers. It is manufactured by Incat of Hobart, Tasmania, and was introduced into Europe during the 1990s...

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