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hob

Overview page.

A sprite or hobgoblin. In Middle English the word meant ‘country fellow’, and was a pet form of Rob, short for Robin or Robert, often referring specifically to Robin Goodfellow.

See overview in Oxford Index

hob

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 71 words.

play (or raise) hob cause mischief; make a fuss. North American Hob is short for hobgoblin and is used

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hob

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 166 words.

In the north of England and some Midlands counties, hob was the most common name for rough, hairy creatures of

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Hober

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 50 words.

1. German (Höber): occupational name for someone whose work involved lifting heavy loads, from an agent derivative of

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hob

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 38 words.

blob, bob, cob, dob, fob, glob, gob, hob, job, knob, lob, mob, nob, rob, slob, snob, sob, squab,

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hob

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 38 words.

blob, bob, cob, dob, fob, glob, gob, hob, job, knob, lob, mob, nob, rob, slob, snob, sob, squab,

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hob-nob

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 53 words.

drink together XVIII; be on familiar terms XIX. orig. hob or nob, hob-a-nob, hob and nob, f.

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Hob [name] <i>n</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 7 words.

ɒb, hɒb

sp hob1

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hob-nob <i>interj</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 7 words.

ˈɒb-ˈnɒb, ˈhɒ-

sp hob nob1

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hob nob <i>v.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 396 words.

to invite to drink and then to clink glasses; thus hob nob/hob a nob, a toast.

1763 G.A. Stevens

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hob

Overview page.

A sprite or hobgoblin. In Middle English the word meant ‘country fellow’, and was a pet form of Rob, short for Robin or Robert, often referring specifically to Robin Goodfellow.

See overview in Oxford Index