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hubris

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

In Greek tragedy, excessive pride towards or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis; in extended usage, excessive pride or self-confidence.

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hubris

in The Oxford Companion to Theatre and Performance

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 102 words.

In ancient Greece hubris was originally a legal term denoting an illegal action, one overstepping the boundaries of justice. It

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hubris

Ronald W. Vince.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 101 words.

In ancient Greece hubris was originally a legal term denoting an illegal action, one overstepping the boundaries of justice. It

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hubris

N. R. E. Fisher.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law; Classical Literature; Religion in the Ancient World; Classical Philosophy. 959 words.

Hubris, intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was a powerful term of moral condemnation in ancient Greece; and in Athens, and perhaps elsewhere, it was also treated as a serious crime. The common use...

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hubris <i>noun</i>

Jennifer Speake and Mark LaFlaur.

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

January 1999; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 126 words.

L19 Greek.

Presumption, insolence; pride, excessive self-confidence.

The earliest instance of hubris in a nonspecialist English text, a newspaper

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The Hubris of Absolutism

David E. Cooper.

in The Measure of Things

December 2007; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy. 15824 words.

This chapter assesses the charge of humanism against absolutism. For the typical absolutist, they have the capacity to provide an account of the world that is both true and clean. This...

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hubris

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

In Greek tragedy, excessive pride towards or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis; in extended usage, excessive pride or self-confidence.

See overview in Oxford Index

hubris

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 113 words.

arris, Clarice, Harries, Harris, Paris • mattress • actress • benefactress • Polaris • enchantress • derris,

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hubris

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 113 words.

arris, Clarice, Harries, Harris, Paris • mattress • actress • benefactress • Polaris • enchantress • derris,

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hubris

Edited by John Roberts.

in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 482 words.

intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was treated as a serious crime in Athens. The term was highly pejorative.

The best ancient discussion

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Hubris

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 4 words.

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hubris

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 3 words.

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Hubris

Phyllis Hartnoll and Peter Found.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theatre. 43 words.

literally, ‘insolence’; in Greek tragedy the type of pride or presumption in a mortal which offends the gods and causes

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hubris

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 8 words.

wanton insolence. XIX. — Gr.

So hubristic XIX.

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hubris

Nick R. E. Fisher.

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 829 words.

intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was a powerful term of moral condemnation in ancient Greece; and in Athens, and perhaps elsewhere, it

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<i>hubris</i>

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 927 words.

intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was a powerful term of moral condemnation in ancient Greece; and in Athens, and perhaps elsewhere, it

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hubris

Nick R. E. Fisher.

in The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical History. 710 words.

intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was a powerful term of moral condemnation in ancient Greece; and in Athens, and perhaps elsewhere, it

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hubris

in The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

January 2014; p ublished online November 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical History. 741 words.

intentionally dishonouring behaviour, was a powerful term of moral condemnation in ancient Greece; and in Athens, and perhaps elsewhere, it

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hubris

Edited by M. C. Howatson.

in The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Literature. 117 words.

English transliteration of Greek hybris, commonly denoting aggressive behaviour aimed at humiliating the victim, which in Athens was an

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hubris

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 3 words.

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hubris

Chris Baldick.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 82 words.

The Greek word for ‘insolence’ or ‘affront’, applied to the arrogance or pride of the protagonist in a tragedy in

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