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irrigation

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

The process of using a solution (irrigant) to wash out debris from a wound, cavity, or root canal. Subgingival irrigation is used to deliver liquid, usually containing an antimicrobial...

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irrigation

in World Encyclopedia

P ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: General Studies. 75 words.

Artificial watering of land for growing crops. Irrigation enables crops to grow in regions with inadequate precipitation. The first irrigation

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irrigate

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 19 words.

XVII. f. pp. of L. irrigāre, f. IR- + rig¯re wet, water; see -ATE.

So irrigation

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Irrigation

Philippe Cullet and Sujith Koonan.

in Water Law in India

September 2011; p ublished online September 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 28898 words.

Irrigation law is one of the oldest and most developed areas of water law. Irrigation acts adopted in different parts of the country reflect, in part, the varied irrigation practices of...

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irrigation

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 82 words.

The provision of water for crops by artificial methods; for example by constructing ditches, pipe systems, and canals. Irrigation can

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irrigation

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 82 words.

The provision of water for crops by artificial methods; for example by constructing ditches, pipe systems, and canals. Irrigation can

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irrigation

Edited by John Roberts.

in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 164 words.

Mesopotamia (Babylonia) and Egypt were the main areas of the ancient world where agriculture depended on irrigation from

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irrigation

Dominic W. Rathbone.

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 269 words.

Mesopotamia (Babylonia) and Egypt were the main areas of the ancient world where agriculture depended on irrigation from

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Irrigation

Alexander Kazhdan and John W. Nesbitt.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 314 words.

(ἄρδευμα). A hot climate and frequent droughts led to a constant concern in Byz. about water. A developed irrigation technique,

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Irrigation

Karl W. Butzer.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

February 2001; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies; Biblical Studies. 3930 words.

Conversion of the Nile floodplain and delta to “perennial” irrigation began in 1833, with the benefit of modern technology.

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Irrigation

Karl W. Butzer.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

January 2001; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Egyptology. 3924 words.

Conversion of the Nile floodplain and delta to “perennial” irrigation began in 1833, with the benefit of modern technology.

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