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legend

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 13 words.

a legend in their own lifetime a very famous or notorious person.

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legend

Overview page. Subjects: Music.

(Ger. Legende).

Title given to short comps. of lyrical or epic character. Well‐known examples are Dvořák's Legends, Op.59 (orch. from pf. duet) and Sibelius's 4 Lemminkäinen...

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legends

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 475 words.

In folklore theory, a ‘legend’ is a short traditional oral narrative about a person, place, or object that really exists,

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legend

Peter Beal.

in A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

January 2008; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (History of the Book). 87 words.

A legend is an inscription, motto, or caption that accompanies some kind of graphic representation, such as wording set out

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legend

W. R. F. Browning.

in A Dictionary of the Bible

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biblical Studies. 150 words.

OT scholars use the term ‘legend’ to designate stories as a literary type without regard for historicity. Since most such

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legend

W. R. F. Browning.

in A Dictionary of the Bible

May 2011; p ublished online October 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies; Biblical Studies. 147 words.

OT scholars use the term ‘legend’ to designate stories as a literary type without regard for historicity. Since most such

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legend

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 53 words.

[ME]

A legend was first ‘the story of a saint's life’, coming from Old French legende, from medieval Latin

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Legends

Jack Zipes.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Children's Literature Studies. 3722 words.

The legend, a genre of short prose narratives, has strong roots in the oral tradition and is still vibrant today

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Legend

Michael Kennedy and Joyce Bourne Kennedy.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 31 words.

Title given to short comps. of lyrical or epic character. Well‐known examples are Dvořák's Legends, Op.59 (orch. from

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legend

Alison Latham.

in The Oxford Companion to Music

P ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 38 words.

A name given to a short composition of lyrical or epic character. Well-known examples are Dvořák's Legends op. 59 and

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Legend

Edited by Joyce Bourne.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Music

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 37 words.

Title given to short comps. of lyrical or epic character. Well‐known examples are *Dvořák's Legends, Op.59 (orch from pf duet) and Sibelius's 4 ...

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legend

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A legend is an inscription, motto, or caption that accompanies some kind of graphic representation, such as wording set out beneath heraldic coats of arms or on maps, paintings, or ...

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legend

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

A traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical but not authenticated. This sense dates from the early 17th century; in Middle English, the word was used to denote the story...

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Contemporary Legends

Elizabeth Tucker and Joel Best.

in Childhood Studies

P ublished online January 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Development Studies. 7799 words.

Contemporary legends (sometimes called urban legends or simply legends) are stories that spread primarily through informal channels. Traditionally, legends spread by word of mouth, but...

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Contemporary Legend

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 50 words.

Founded in 1991, this is the annual journal of the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research, covering all aspects

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migratory legends

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 114 words.

A legend which is found repeatedly at different places, having the same plot in every case but with place names

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Golden Legend

Alain Boureau.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 552 words.

The Legenda aurea or Golden legend, a hagiographical compilation completed in c.1265 by the Dominican Jacobus de Voragine,

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Anzac Legend

Peter Dennis, Jeffrey Grey, Ewan Morris, Robin Prior and Jean Bou.

in The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Military History. 5622 words.

The terms Anzac legend, Anzac myth and Anzac tradition are widely used, not only in academic writing but also in

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Black Legend

William S. Maltby.

in The Oxford Companion to World Exploration

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: World History. 665 words.

The Black Legend (“La Leyenda Negra”) portrays the Spanish people as more cruel, greedy, and ignorant than other Europeans. A

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. Legends and Legend Ecologies

Michael Kinsella.

in Legend-Tripping Online

May 2011; p ublished online March 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature. 7244 words.

Stories of anomalous experiences, such as strange objects in the skies or goliath bipedal monsters, comprise what is known as supernatural legendry. From chain letters promising either...

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