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march

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 280 words.

[LME]

There are three English words march, if you include March. The march with the sense ‘to walk in

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march

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 11 words.

arch, larch, march, parch, starch • frogmarch • cornstarch

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march

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 11 words.

arch, larch, march, parch, starch • frogmarch • cornstarch

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march

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence.

March to a different drum conform to different principles and practices from those around one; ultimately from Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854).

See also hunger march, Long March...

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Marches

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 87 words.

The boundaries between England and Wales, and England and Scotland, were called marches. Hence ‘marcher lords’, the powerful vassals with

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march

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 134 words.

an army marches on its stomach: see stomach.

march to (the beat of) a different tune (or drum

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march

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Derived from the Old English mearc, meaning ‘boundary’, march denoted a tract of land along a border, notably the marches of Wales and Scotland.

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March

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 13 words.

mad as a March hare: see mad as a hatter at mad.

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marches

Overview page. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism.

In Shakespeare's plays were accompanied by the drum (muffled for dead marches), occasionally with the fife too; a passage in 1 Henry VI 3.7.29–35 suggests that English and French marches...

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March

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 130 words.

1. English: topographic name for someone who lived on the border between two territories, especially in the Marches between England

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marches

Thérèse Boespflug.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 1538 words.

The Marches (Italian Marche) are the modern name for a region of Italy extending along the Adriatic side of

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March

Erich Schwandt and Andrew Lamb.

in Grove Music Online

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 5105 words.

Music with strong repetitive rhythms and an uncomplicated style usually used to accompany orderly military movements and processions. Since the 16th century, functional march music has...

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march

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 28 words.

walk in a military manner. XVI. — (O)F. marcher walk, orig. tread, trample:- Gallo-Rom. *marcāre, f. late L.

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March

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 19 words.

XII. — OF. march(e), north-eastern var. of marz, (also mod.) mars :- L. Martius lit. ‘(month) of Mars’.

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march

Edited by David Hey.

in The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Local and Family History. 126 words.

Derived from the Old English mearc, meaning ‘boundary’, ‘march’ denoted a tract of land along a border, notably the

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marches

in The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 40 words.

in Shakespeare's plays were accompanied by the drum (muffled for dead marches), occasionally with the fife too; a passage in

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marches

in The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

January 2015; p ublished online October 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 41 words.

in Shakespeare’s plays were accompanied by the *drum (muffled for dead marches), occasionally with the *fife too; a

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march

David Hey.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Local and Family History. 25 words.

Derived from the Old English mearc, meaning ‘boundary’, march denoted a tract of land along a border, notably the

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march

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 39 words.

march to a different drum conform to different principles and practices from those around one; ultimately from Henry David Thoreau ...

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march

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Military History. 110 words.

v.

1 walk in a military manner with a regular measured tread: they marched past the cemetery.

2 walk

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