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mumpsimus

Overview page.

A traditional custom or notion adhered to although shown to be unreasonable; a person who obstinately adheres to such a custom or notion. The word represents an erroneous version of Latin s...

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mumpsimus

Overview page.

A traditional custom or notion adhered to although shown to be unreasonable; a person who obstinately adheres to such a custom or notion. The word represents an erroneous version of Latin s...

See overview in Oxford Index

Mumpsimus

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 142 words.

This word is an example of the practice of making new words by declaration. With the meaning, ‘an erroneous doctrinal

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mumpsimus

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 68 words.

a traditional custom or notion adhered to although shown to be unreasonable; a person who obstinately adheres to such a

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mumpsimus <i>noun</i>

Jennifer Speake and Mark LaFlaur.

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

January 1999; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 124 words.

M16 pseudo-Latin (erroneously for Latin sumpsimus in the passage in the Eucharistic service that runs quod in ore sumpsimus ‘which

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Editorial Mumpsimus in the Poems of Gerard Hopkins

R. J. C. WATT.

in The Library

December 1999; p ublished online December 1999 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Literature. 0 words.

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sumpsimus

Overview page.

A correct expression taking the place of an incorrect but popular one. The word comes from Latin, and means ‘we have taken’ (see mumpsimus).

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