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panjandrum

Overview page.

A person who has or claims to have a great deal of authority or influence. The word comes from Grand Panjandrum, an invented phrase in a nonsense passage composed in 1755 by the English...

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panjandrum

Overview page.

A person who has or claims to have a great deal of authority or influence. The word comes from Grand Panjandrum, an invented phrase in a nonsense passage composed in 1755 by the English...

See overview in Oxford Index

panjandrum

Edited by Russ Willey.

in Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 197 words.

A pretentious or pompous official, a local ‘potentate’. The word occurs in the farrago of nonsense composed in 1755 by

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Panjandrum

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 176 words.

A pretentious or pompous official, a local ‘potentate’. The word occurs in the farrago of nonsense composed in 1755 by

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panjandrum

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 159 words.

• minimum • maximum • optimum • chrysanthemum, helianthemum • cardamom • Pergamum • sesamum • per annum •

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panjandrum

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 159 words.

• minimum • maximum • optimum • chrysanthemum, helianthemum • cardamom • Pergamum • sesamum • per annum •

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panjandrum

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 43 words.

nonsense word, simulating comps. of PAN-, occurring in the farrago of nonsense composed by Samuel Foote in 1755 to

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panjandrum

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 54 words.

a person who has or claims to have a great deal of authority or influence. The word comes from Grand

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panjandrum

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 93 words.

[M18th]

This term for a pompous person is one of the few words we can say when, how, and by

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‘Panjandrum, The’

in Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

January 1999; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century). 104 words.

first published in Saint Pauls, January–February 1870 (reprinted in ET). ‘Just thirty years’ ago the editor and five

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<i>Great Panjandrum, The</i>

Daniel Hahn.

in The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature

January 2015; p ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Children's Literature Studies. 235 words.

A piece of *nonsense current in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It is said to have been made

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