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plotter

Edited by Richard Cammack, Teresa Atwood, Peter Campbell, Howard Parish, Anthony Smith, Frank Vella and John Stirling.

in Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

January 2006; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biochemistry. 10 words.

an instrument for automatically making a plot (def. 1).

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plot

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 36 words.

lose the plot lose one's ability to understand or cope with what is happening, lose touch with reality.

the plot

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Plot

Alan Singer.

in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature

April 2009; p ublished online September 2009 .

Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. 12025 words.

This article looks at the importance of plot in literature. It discusses Frank Kermode's expansive analysis of narrative plot making throughout human history, The Sense of an Ending, and...

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plot

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Lose the plot lose one's ability to understand or cope with what is happening, lose touch with reality.

the plot thickens the situation becomes more difficult and complex; from...

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plot

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence — Science and Mathematics.

To mark points on a coordinate graph. Also used in relating to constructing the curve of a function—by plotting a number of points and inferring the behaviour of the curve between the...

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plot

Peter Beal.

in A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

January 2008; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (History of the Book). 588 words.

A plot is a plan or scheme, constituting the organizing design that gives a piece of literature such as a

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plot

Edited by Richard Cammack, Teresa Atwood, Peter Campbell, Howard Parish, Anthony Smith, Frank Vella and John Stirling.

in Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

January 2006; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biochemistry. 18 words.

1 a diagram showing the relationship between two or more variables.

2 to construct such a plot.

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plot

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 82 words.

lose the plot lose your ability to understand what is happening; lose touch with reality. informal 1997 Spectator The truth

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Plot

Joan G. Kotker.

in The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

January 1999; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1067 words.

The plot of any literary work is a map of what happens within it. In most classic crime and mystery

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Plot

in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

P ublished online August 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets). 1919 words.

may be defined as the pattern or structure of textual events. Conceptions of plot vary, but common to most of

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