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protein

Overview page. Subjects: Science and Mathematics — Medicine and Health.

A large complex molecule made up of one or more chains of amino acids joined by peptide bonds. Proteins are the principal constituents of cellular material and serve as enzymes, hormones,...

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Protein

Felicity Savage King and Ann Burgess.

in Nutrition for Developing Countries

January 1993; p ublished online September 2009 .

Chapter. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology. 2541 words.

This chapter discusses the importance of proteins. Topics covered include amino acids, complete and incomplete proteins, how the body uses protein, and protein needs. Foods containing...

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protein

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 64 words.

• diamantine • dentine • Benedictine • Christine, pristine, Sistine • Springsteen • tontine • protein • Justine •

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protein

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 64 words.

• diamantine • dentine • Benedictine • Christine, pristine, Sistine • Springsteen • tontine • protein • Justine •

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protein

Michael Kent.

in Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 445 words.

Proteins have been described as the very stuff of life. The word ‘protein’ is from a Greek word meaning ‘of

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protein

Michael Kent.

in Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise

P ublished online November 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 445 words.

Proteins have been described as the very stuff of life. The word ‘protein’ is from a Greek word meaning ‘of

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protein

Elizabeth Martin.

in The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 19 words.

For depicting amino-acid sequences of proteins, see peptide. For denoting proteins as products of genes, see gene products.

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proteins

Colin Blakemore and Sheila Jennett.

in The Oxford Companion to the Body

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 795 words.

The term ‘protein’ is derived from the Greek word proteious, meaning ‘of the first rank’. Proteins are indeed ‘of

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proteins

in The Oxford Companion to Wine

January 2015; p ublished online November 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 263 words.

very large polymers of the 20 natural amino acids. Proteins are essential to all living beings.

In grapes

Proteins

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proteins

in The Oxford Companion to Wine

January 2006; p ublished online August 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 538 words.

very large polymers of the 20 natural amino acids. Proteins are essential to all living beings.

In grapes

Proteins

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Proteins

Aysha Divan and Janice A. Royds.

in Molecular Biology

August 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Molecular Biology and Genetics. 4792 words.

Biological functions require protein and the protein makeup of a cell determines its behaviour and identity. Proteins, therefore, are the most abundant molecules in the body except for...

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