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rack

Overview page. Subjects: History.

An instrument of torture consisting of a frame on which the victim was stretched by turning rollers to which the wrists and ankles were tied; it is first recorded in English in Caxton'...

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racking

Allan Beaver.

in A Dictionary of Travel and Tourism

P ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Travel and Holiday. 4 words.

See brochure racking.

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rack

Edited by John Ayto.

in An A-Z of Food and Drink

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 199 words.

The now fashionable rack of lamb is distinctly a revival. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, rack was a term

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rack

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 234 words.

at rack and manger amid abundance or plenty. A rack is a frame in which hay is placed, and a

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rack

John Ayto.

in The Diner’s Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 227 words.

The now fashionable rack of lamb is distinctly a revival. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, rack was a term

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rack

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 32 words.

go to rack and ruin gradually deteriorate in condition because of neglect: fall into disrepair; rack here is a variant (recorded from the late 16th century) of ...

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rack

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 13 words.

phr. to rack (and ruin) to destruction. XVI. var. of WRACK.

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rack

Overview page.

Go to rack and ruin gradually deteriorate in condition because of neglect: fall into disrepair; rack here is a variant (recorded from the late 16th century) of wrack ‘damage, disaster’.

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Rackers

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 21 words.

German (Räckers): in the Lower Rhine-Westphalia area, from a reduced form of Rädeker, itself a reduced form

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Rack

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 38 words.

German (also Räck):

1. from a short form of a Germanic personal name, formed with rag-, from ragin

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rack

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 151 words.

The word rack is a complicated one with many senses. The important thing to know about the two spellings is

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rack

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 81 words.

in the phrase rack and ruin means ‘destruction’ and is normally spelt in this way in BrE, although it is

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rack

Edited by Robert Allen.

in Pocket Fowler's Modern English Usage

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 81 words.

in the phrase rack and ruin means ‘destruction’ and is normally spelt in this way in BrE, although it is

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rack

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 156 words.

[ME]

The rack is the name of a medieval instrument of torture. It consisted of a frame on which a

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rack

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 140 words.

in rack and ruin means ‘destruction’ and is normally so spelt in this phrase in BrE. One of nine nouns and seven verbs with the same spelling, it is a spelling variant of ...

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rack

Overview page. Subjects: History.

An instrument of torture consisting of a frame on which the victim was stretched by turning rollers to which the wrists and ankles were tied; it is first recorded in English in Caxton'...

See overview in Oxford Index

RACKs

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

Proteins (receptors for activated C kinase) that selectively bind activated protein kinase C and thus control their attachment to membranes or other elements at various locations in the...

See overview in Oxford Index

racking <i>adj</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 6 words.

ˈrakɪn, -ɪŋ

sp racking1

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rack-rent

Edited by Trischa Mann.

in Australian Law Dictionary

October 2017; p ublished online April 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law. 79 words.

Historically, very high, excessive, or extortionate rent (from metaphor of being extended or ‘stretched’, as on a rack). A rack-renter

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rack differential

Tony Atkins and Marcel Escudier.

in A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering

January 2013; p ublished online September 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Mechanical Engineering. 44 words.

A linear-displacement differential in which two parallel racks moving in opposite directions engage with opposite sides of a pinion.

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instrumentation rack

E. Julius Dasch.

in A Dictionary of Space Exploration

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 31 words.

A storage rack on a spaceship for various instruments and equipment, such as computers and radio transmitters and receivers. On

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