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rhubarb

Overview page. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink.

Leaf-stalks of the perennial plant, Rheum rhabarbarum. Has a high content of oxalic acid (the leaves contain even more, and are toxic). A 200‐g portion (stewed without sugar) is a source of...

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rhubarb

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 13 words.

barb, carb, garb, hijab, nawab, Punjab, sahib • rhubarb • mihrab

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rhubarb

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 13 words.

barb, carb, garb, hijab, nawab, Punjab, sahib • rhubarb • mihrab

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rhubarb

Edited by John Ayto.

in An A-Z of Food and Drink

January 2002; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 312 words.

Rhubarb seems to have originated in China, and was first imported to the West via Russia for the sake of

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rhubarb

John Ayto.

in The Diner’s Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 366 words.

Rhubarb seems to have originated in China, and was first imported to the West via Russia for the sake of

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<span class="smallCaps">Rhubarb</span>

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 475 words.

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum), related to sorrel, grows in a form typical of vegetables, but the U.S. Customs Court

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Rhubarb

Sara Rath.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

January 2004; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Cookery, Food, and Drink. 476 words.

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum), related to sorrel, grows in a form typical of vegetables, but the U.S. Customs Court

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rhubarb

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 92 words.

[LME]

English speakers have been eating rhubarb since medieval times. It came originally from China and Tibet, and the name

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rhubarb

Overview page.

Informal term for the noise made by a group of actors to give the impression of indistinct background conversation or to represent the noise of a crowd, especially by the random repetition...

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rhubarb <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 163 words.

the genitals, of either sex; thus the coarse query, How's your rhubarb, Missus?

1936 in Randolph & Legman Ozark Folksongs

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rhubarb <i>noun</i>

Edited by John Ayto and John Simpson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang

January 2008; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 125 words.

1 orig theatre The word ‘rhubarb’ repeated to give the impression of the murmur of conversation, etc. 1934–. J.

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