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seditious Libel

Overview page. Subjects: Law — Politics.

Seditious libel is the crime of making public statements that threaten to undermine respect for the government, laws, or public officials. The Sedition Act of 1798 made it a crime ...

See overview in Oxford Index

seditious libel

John J. Patrick, Richard M. Pious and Donald A. Ritchie.

in The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

January 1993; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: US Politics. 449 words.

Seditious libel is the crime of making public statements that threaten to undermine respect for the government, laws, or public

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Seditious Libel

in The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Courts and Procedure. 740 words.

Slowly taking shape in seventeenth‐century England, the crime of seditious libel encompassed any political criticism that threatened to diminish

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seditious Libel

Overview page. Subjects: Law — Politics.

Seditious libel is the crime of making public statements that threaten to undermine respect for the government, laws, or public officials. The Sedition Act of 1798 made it a crime ...

See overview in Oxford Index

Pickering, Lewis (bap. 1571), courtier and convicted seditious libeller

Alastair Bellany.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Law; Criminology and Criminal Justice; Social and Cultural History. 679 words.

Pickering, Lewis (bap. 1571), courtier and convicted seditious libeller, was baptized in February 1571, the son of John Pickering of Tichmarsh, Northamptonshire, and his second wife,...

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The Crime of Seditious Libel, and England’s Evisceration of Freedoms of Press and Speech

Wendell Bird.

in Press and Speech Under Assault

February 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of the Americas; Political History. 20322 words.

Chapter 2 describes the development of the crime of seditious libel (criticism of government) in English common law, and the crown judges’ purposeful effort to support the government and...

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The Collision of Seditious Libel and Freedoms of Press and Speech in America’s Constitutional Period

Wendell Bird.

in Press and Speech Under Assault

February 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of the Americas; Political History. 19914 words.

Chapter 3 describes the collision in late eighteenth-century America between freedoms of press and speech and the crime of seditious libel. It discusses how the new states’ declarations of...

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Crimes against the State and the Intersection of Fascism and Democracy in the 1920s-30s: Vilification, Seditious Libel and the Limits of Legality

Stephen Skinner.

in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies

September 2016; p ublished online December 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law; Law and Society. 11573 words.

Situated in relation to on-going critical discussion of the theory and practice of the rule of law in historical perspective, this article undertakes a comparative analysis of the offences...

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Treason, Seditious Libel, and Literature in the Romantic Period

Jon Mee.

P ublished online October 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800); Literary Studies (19th Century); Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 9398 words.

This article examines the effects of the unprecedented number of prosecutions for political opinion in the 1790s and afterward on romantic period literature. The chief instrument for these...

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT ELIZA HAYWOOD'S 1749 ARREST FOR SEDITIOUS LIBEL

CATHERINE INGRASSIA.

in Notes and Queries

June 1997; p ublished online June 1997 .

Journal Article. Subjects: History; Linguistics; Literature. 0 words.

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Zenger, John Peter (1697–1746)

in The Oxford Companion to the Book

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History. 105 words.

whose acquittal in a landmark trial for seditious libel set an important precedent for freedom of the press from government

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Sedition.

Norman L. Rosenberg.

in The Oxford Companion to United States History

January 2001; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: United States History. 499 words.

Also known as seditious libel, this crime initially covered any “dangerous words” threatening the authority of the state, the sanctity

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general warrants

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 92 words.

Eighteenth‐cent. secretaries of state claimed a discretionary power in cases of seditious libel to issue general warrants for the arrest

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general warrants

John Cannon and Robert Crowcroft.

in A Dictionary of British History

P ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 96 words.

Eighteenth‐cent. secretaries of state claimed a discretionary power in cases of seditious libel to issue general warrants for the arrest of persons unnamed. In ...

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general warrants

J. A. Cannon.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 109 words.

Eighteenth-cent. secretaries of state claimed a discretionary power in cases of seditious libel to issue general warrants for the arrest

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general warrants

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 111 words.

Eighteenth-cent. secretaries of state claimed a discretionary power in cases of seditious libel to issue general warrants for the arrest

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SEDITION

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Politics and Law. 533 words.

Also known as seditious libel, this crime initial-ly covered any “dangerous words” threatening the authority of the state, the sanctity

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trial of the seven bishops

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity.

When James II in 1688 ordered that his Declaration of Indulgence should be read in all churches, Abp. W. Sancroft and six other bishops protested. They were imprisoned and tried on a charge...

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North Briton

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — British History.

Was the satirical name John Wilkes gave to his weekly periodical, launched in June 1762 in opposition to Smollett's the Briton, published in support of Bute's administration. It included...

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Liberties of Press and Speech: ‘Evidence Does Not Exist To Contradict the … Blackstonian Sense’ in Late 18th Century England?

Wendell Bird.

in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies

March 2016; p ublished online March 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law; Law and Society. 14855 words.

Blackstone, in the last volume of his Commentaries in 1769, defined freedom of the press as merely ‘laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for...

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Browne, John Ross

Richard H. Dillon.

in American National Biography Online

January 1999; p ublished online February 2000 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Military History; Warfare and Defence; Law; Criminology and Criminal Justice; World History; Travel and Holiday; Literary Studies (Travel Literature); Literature; Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers). 1392 words.

Browne, John Ross (11 February 1821–08 December 1875), writer, world traveler, and government agent, was born in Beggars Bush, near Dublin, Ireland, the son of Thomas Egerton Browne and...

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