Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-10 of 106 items for:

synecdoche x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

synecdoche

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(pron. ‘sinekdoki’),

a figure of speech by which a more comprehensive term is used for a less comprehensive or vice versa, as whole for part or part for whole, e.g. ‘There were six...

See overview in Oxford Index

synecdoche

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 14 words.

- L. synecdochē — Gr. sunekdokhḗ, f. sunekdékhesthai, f. SYN- + ekdékhesthai take up.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

synecdoche

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(pron. ‘sinekdoki’),

a figure of speech by which a more comprehensive term is used for a less comprehensive or vice versa, as whole for part or part for whole, e.g. ‘There were six...

See overview in Oxford Index

synecdoche

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 75 words.

A standard form in *rhetoric in which either a part can be made to stand in for a whole,

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

synecdoche

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

February 2018; p ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 75 words.

A standard form in *rhetoric in which either a part can be made to stand in for a whole,

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

synecdoche

Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday.

in A Dictionary of Media and Communication

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Media Studies. 45 words.

(*rhetoric) A *trope or *figure of speech involving the substitution of part for whole, genus

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Synecdoche

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 54 words.

A figure of speech that consists of putting a part for the whole, the whole for the part, a more

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Synecdoche

Edited by Tom McArthur.

in Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 67 words.

In rhetoric, a figure of speech concerned with parts and wholes: (1) Where the part represents the whole: ‘All

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Synecdochē

Richard Nate.

in Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 601 words.

(Lat. conceptio, intellectio)

is a metasememe that signifies a relationship of the particular and the general. Like metonymy, it

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

synecdoche

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 52 words.

pronounced si-nek-duh-kee, is a figure of speech in which a more inclusive term is used for a

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

synecdoche

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 60 words.

/sɪˈnɛkdәki/. A figure of speech in which a more inclusive term is used for a less inclusive one or

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page