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synecdoche

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(pron. ‘sinekdoki’),

a figure of speech by which a more comprehensive term is used for a less comprehensive or vice versa, as whole for part or part for whole, e.g. ‘There were six...

See overview in Oxford Index

synecdoche

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(pron. ‘sinekdoki’),

a figure of speech by which a more comprehensive term is used for a less comprehensive or vice versa, as whole for part or part for whole, e.g. ‘There were six...

See overview in Oxford Index

synecdoche

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 75 words.

A standard form in *rhetoric in which either a part can be made to stand in for a whole,

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synecdoche

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

February 2018; p ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 75 words.

A standard form in *rhetoric in which either a part can be made to stand in for a whole,

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synecdoche

Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday.

in A Dictionary of Media and Communication

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Media Studies. 45 words.

(*rhetoric) A *trope or *figure of speech involving the substitution of part for whole, genus

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Synecdoche

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 54 words.

A figure of speech that consists of putting a part for the whole, the whole for the part, a more

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Synecdoche

Edited by Tom McArthur.

in Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 67 words.

In rhetoric, a figure of speech concerned with parts and wholes: (1) Where the part represents the whole: ‘All

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Synecdochē

Richard Nate.

in Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 601 words.

(Lat. conceptio, intellectio)

is a metasememe that signifies a relationship of the particular and the general. Like metonymy, it

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synecdoche

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 52 words.

pronounced si-nek-duh-kee, is a figure of speech in which a more inclusive term is used for a

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synecdoche

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 60 words.

/sɪˈnɛkdәki/. A figure of speech in which a more inclusive term is used for a less inclusive one or

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synecdoche

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 101 words.

chokey, croaky, folkie, folky, hokey, hokey-cokey, hoki, jokey, karaoke, Loki, okey-dokey, Okie, pokey, poky, smoky, trochee • adzuki

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