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tide

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

1 The periodic rise and fall of the Earth's oceans, caused by the relative gravitational attraction of the Sun, Moon, and Earth. The effect of the Moon is about twice that of...

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tide

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 18 words.

flow or carry along like the tide XVI; get over, surmount XVII. f. TIDE B.

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tide

Overview page.

A particular time, season, or festival of the Christian Church; tide meaning ‘time, period, era’ is recorded from Old English (in form tīd) and is of German origin, ultimately related to...

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tide

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 105 words.

The belief that people at the coast will only die as the tide goes out is included in Charles Dickens's

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tide

Susan Mayhew.

in A Dictionary of Geography

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 132 words.

Tides result from the gravitational pull of the moon and sun on the Earth (which also affects land masses, but

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tide

Susan Mayhew.

in A Dictionary of Geography

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography. 174 words.

Tides result from the gravitational pull of the moon and sun on the Earth (which also affects land masses, but

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Tides

Edited by Stephen H. Schneider, Terry L. Root and Michael D. Mastrandrea.

in Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Meteorology and Climatology. 1912 words.

The term tide is used to describe the periodic motions of the ocean, atmosphere, or solid earth that are directly

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tide

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 29 words.

go (or swim) with (or against) the tide act in accordance with (or against) the prevailing opinion

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tide

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 99 words.

a particular time, season, or festival of the Christian Church; tide meaning ‘time, period, era’ is recorded from Old English

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tide

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 118 words.

[OE]

In Old English a tide was a period or season, a sense surviving in Eastertide and Shrovetide, and

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tide

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

1 The periodic rise and fall of the Earth's oceans, caused by the relative gravitational attraction of the Sun, Moon, and Earth. The effect of the Moon is about twice that of...

See overview in Oxford Index