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truncheon

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence.

ˈtrǝnchǝn

1 n. chiefly Brit. a short, thick stick carried as a weapon by a police officer.

2 a staff or baton acting as a symbol of authority.

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

truncheon

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence.

ˈtrǝnchǝn

1 n. chiefly Brit. a short, thick stick carried as a weapon by a police officer.

2 a staff or baton acting as a symbol of authority.

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

truncheon

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 6 words.

So spelled. See spelling (a).

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truncheon

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 504 words.

ashen, fashion, passion, ration • abstraction, action, attraction, benefaction, compaction, contraction, counteraction, diffraction, enaction, exaction, extraction, faction,

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truncheon

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 497 words.

ashen, fashion, passion, ration • abstraction, action, attraction, benefaction, compaction, contraction, counteraction, diffraction, enaction, exaction, extraction, faction,

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truncheon

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 33 words.

†piece broken off; †fragment or shaft of a spear XIII; short thick staff; staff as symbol of authority XVI. —

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truncheon

in The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

January 2001; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Military History. 53 words.

1 n. chiefly Brit. a short, thick stick carried as a weapon by a police officer.

2 a staff or

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truncheon <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 264 words.

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trunchioner / ~s <i>n</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 7 words.

ˈtrɤnʃɪǝnǝɹz

sp truncheoners1

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trunchion / ~’s <i>n</i>

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 12 words.

ˈtrɤnʃɪǝn / -z

sp truncheon2, trunchion2 / truncheons1

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cosh

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 8 words.

stout stick, truncheon. XIX. of unkn. orig.

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tomahawk <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 14 words.

a policeman's truncheon.

1909 J. Ware Passing Eng. of the Victorian Era.

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wooden aspro

Tony Deverson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealandisms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 15 words.

noun jocular (especially prison usage) a blow to the head with a truncheon.

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Palka

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 42 words.

Polish (Pałka): from pałka ‘truncheon’, ‘club’, used as a nickname applied either to a thin or stiff person,

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Palys

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 34 words.

Polish (Pałys): variant of Pałysz, a derivative of pała ‘staff’, ‘club’, ‘truncheon’, which was also used metaphorically

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blue-vein salami <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 39 words.

the penis, usu. in the context of fellatio.

1999 G. Seal Lingo 126: Fellatio is munchin' the truncheon, but

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whacker <i>n.</i> (<i>UK Und.</i>)

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 41 words.

a police truncheon.

1916 T. Burke Limehouse Nights 288: He lashed out and sent a cop down with a jemmy.

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sag <i>n.</i> (<i>US tramp</i>)

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 25 words.

a police truncheon.

1931 Irwin Amer. Tramp and Und. Sl. 163: Sag.–A policeman's club or billy.

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sag <i>v.</i> (<i>US tramp</i>)

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 44 words.

to beat with a truncheon.

1927 ‘Jargon of the Und.’ in DN V 461: Sag, To club senseless. 1931

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warder

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 42 words.

(arch.) staff, truncheon XV. Reduced form of †warderer (XIV), perh. orig. joc. use of †warderere look out behind

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Billy

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 380 words.

1. In North American use a policeman’s truncheon. The word probably comes from the personal name Billy.

2. In Australia

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