Book

The Morality of Happiness

Julia Annas

Published in print August 1995 | ISBN: 9780195096521
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199833061 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195096525.001.0001
The Morality of Happiness

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Antiochus: The Intuitive View

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 4641 words.

Antiochus’ is a hybrid theory, seeking convergence between Aristotelian and Stoic accounts of nature. He aims to retain the Stoic developmental account of virtue as the culmination of a...

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Aristotelian Responses

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 7880 words.

Later hybrid theories in Antiochus and Arius Didymus restate an Aristotelian position on the insufficiency of virtue for happiness, with some attempted compromise with the Stoic view, but...

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Aristotle: An Unstable View

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 12952 words.

Aristotle, in making virtuous activity necessary but not sufficient for happiness, tries to do justice to the intuitive requirement that the content of happiness not be revised so as to...

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Aristotle: Nature and Mere Nature

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 11173 words.

Aristotle argues that the virtues develop from nature as matter (mere nature) to nature as form, an ideal. Nature is also, however, what is ‘always or for the most part’. These points are...

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The Epicureans: Rethinking What Is Natural

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 8402 words.

Epicurus’ appeal to nature to show that our final end is pleasure is less crude than often thought. Instead of formulating a hedonic calculus, he distinguishes between desires in terms of...

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Epicurus: Virtue, Pleasure and Time

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 10439 words.

Epicurus, in claiming that happiness is really pleasure, produces an account of pleasure as tranquility tailored to allow it to be our final end. This greatly revises our attitudes to...

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Finding Room for Other‐Concern

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 13326 words.

The Cyrenaics are hedonists who have difficulty finding a stable place in their theory either for one's life as a whole or for other‐concern. Epicurus tries to avoid their problems by his...

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The Good of Others

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 1832 words.

Because of their eudaimonistic structure, ancient theories have been criticized as egoistic, but this is a mistake, overlooking the place in them of philia or ‘friendship’, covering...

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Happiness and the Demands of Virtue

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 6178 words.

Ancient ethical theories produce differing accounts of happiness, depending on their position on the nature and importance of virtue. These are important debates, recognizably on the same...

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Happiness, Success and What Matters

Julia Annas.

in The Morality of Happiness

August 1995; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Ancient Philosophy. 2630 words.

Ancient ethical theories all assume that we are seeking our happiness when we try to live a moral life. This produces considerable revision of the intuitive content of happiness, different...

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